North Manchester General Hospital

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North Manchester General Hospital
Pennine Acute Hospitals NHS Trust
North Manchester General Hospital - geograph.org.uk - 3747034.jpg
North Manchester General Hospital (the older buildings in the background formed part of Delaunays Hospital)
North Manchester General Hospital is located in Greater Manchester
North Manchester General Hospital
Shown in Greater Manchester
Geography
LocationCrumpsall, Manchester, England, United Kingdom
Coordinates53°31′N 2°14′W / 53.52°N 2.23°W / 53.52; -2.23Coordinates: 53°31′N 2°14′W / 53.52°N 2.23°W / 53.52; -2.23
Organisation
Care systemPublic NHS
Hospital typeDistrict General
Services
Emergency departmentYes Accident & Emergency
Beds800
History
Founded1977
Links
Websitehttp://www.pat.nhs.uk/
ListsHospitals in England

North Manchester General Hospital is a large NHS hospital located in Crumpsall in the north of the English city of Manchester. It is operated as part of the Pennine Acute Hospitals NHS Trust. There is an accident and emergency unit, together with a maternity unit, high dependency unit and a mental health wing.

History[edit]

Introduction[edit]

This extensive hospital site originally included three separate hospitals: Crumpsall Hospital, Delaunays Hospital and Springfield Hospital: these three hospitals amalgamated to create North Manchester General Hospital in 1977.[1]

Crumpsall Hospital[edit]

Crumpsall Hospital built as an infirmary in 1876
Patient in bed with nurse, diet and prescription board at Crumpsall Hospital in 1890

Crumpsall Hospital was built as an infirmary for the Manchester Union Workhouse and opened in 1876.[2][a]

In 1914 the hospital was a receiving station firstly for 500 casualties from Belgium. By 1924 there was an X-ray department, ear, eye and dental departments and a chiropody room. There were then 4 or 5 resident medical officers, who usually stayed for about 2 years, rotating through the different specialities. In 1927 a new dispensary and a separate block for operating theatres, X-ray, dental and recovery rooms was built.[3]

The Infirmary had 1,440 beds in 1928 with a further 600 in the attached mental department. The patients included both chronic and acute cases and both acute cases and the work of the obstetric and gynaecological department had been increasing. The hospital had a bacteriological and pathological laboratory and was a registered training school for nurses both in general medical and surgical work and in midwifery. in 1929 it became a municipal hospital.[4]

In 1948 the hospital joined the National Health Service.[2] In 1951 a nurses sick bay, a premature babies unit and a new Physiotherapy department were opened. In 1952 the hospital was recognised by Manchester University for clinical teaching and some of the senior medical staff were appointed honorary lecturers.[5]

Delaunays Hospital[edit]

Delaunays Hospital was designed by Thomas Worthington as a workhouse and hospital for the Prestwich Board of Guardians and opened in 1869.[2] The Preswich Workhouse and Hospital was absorbed into the Manchester Union Workhouse in 1915.[6]

Springfield Hospital[edit]

The Cotton Famine Window, North Manchester General Hospital, taken from a convalescent home in Southport

Springfield Hospital had its origins in the new Manchester Union Workhouse, designed by Mills and Murgatroyd, and completed in 1853.[6] The workhouse developed into a hospital for the mentally ill known as the Crumpsall Institution. It was renamed Park House in 1939 and became Springfield Hospital on joining the National Health Service in 1948.[7]

Post-merger[edit]

Crumpsall Hospital, Delaunays Hospital and Springfield Hospital amalgamated to create North Manchester General Hospital in 1977.[1] After the Victoria Memorial Jewish Hospital closed in 1992, the Jewish Victoria Wing was established at the North Manchester General Hospital.[8][b] Similarly, after the Northern Hospital for Women and Children closed in 1994, Women and Children's services were centralised at the North Manchester General Hospital.[10][c] A new women's and children's block opened in June 2010.[12]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The Manchester Union Workhouse itself developed into Springfield Hospital
  2. ^ The Victoria Memorial Jewish Hospital was opened in 1904 with 16 beds. By 1928 the number of beds had increased to 62 and at that time a new block containing about 28 beds was being planned. The staff consisted of two resident house surgeons and 12 honorary medical and surgical staff.[9]
  3. ^ The Northern Hospital for Women and Children was founded in 1856 as a dispensary in Stevenson Square, Manchester by Dr. August Schoepf Merei and Dr. James Whitehead. In 1867 it moved to a site in the northern suburbs and during the next 70 years expanded progressively until in 1928 it had 22 beds for women patients and 51 cots for children. Further expansion was then planned and Sir Edward Holt, Bart., donated a site at Alms Hill, Cheetham, intended for the construction of a new and larger hospital.[11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "North Manchester General Hospital". National Archives. Retrieved 27 August 2018.
  2. ^ a b c "Crumpsall Hospital". Archives Hub. Retrieved 27 August 2018.
  3. ^ Hall, Susan; Perry, D L (1976). Crumpsall Hospital 1876–1976. Littleborough: Upjohn & Bottomley. pp. 6–43. |access-date= requires |url= (help)
  4. ^ The Book of Manchester and Salford written for the ninety-seventh annual meeting of the British Medical Association in July 1929. Manchester: George Falkner & Sons, 1929; p. 138-39
  5. ^ Hall, Susan; Perry, D L (1976). Crumpsall Hospital 1876–1976. Littleborough: Upjohn & Bottomley. pp. 6–43. |access-date= requires |url= (help)
  6. ^ a b "Crumpsall Hospital and Institution". National Archives. Retrieved 27 August 2018.
  7. ^ "Manchester". Workhouses. Retrieved 27 August 2018.
  8. ^ "Manchester Victoria Memorial Jewish Hospital, Manchester". National Archives. Retrieved 27 August 2018.
  9. ^ The Book of Manchester and Salford written for the ninety-seventh annual meeting of the British Medical Association in July 1929. Manchester: George Falkner & Sons, 1929; p. 135
  10. ^ "Manchester Northern Hospital, Manchester". National Archives. Retrieved 27 August 2018.
  11. ^ The Book of Manchester and Salford written for the ninety-seventh annual meeting of the British Medical Association in July 1929. Manchester: George Falkner & Sons, 1929; p. 128-29
  12. ^ "Unit ready to deliver better care". Manchester Evening News. 10 June 2010. Retrieved 27 August 2018.

External links[edit]