North Wilmington (MBTA station)

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NORTH WILMINGTON
Inbound train at North Wilmington station, June 2015.JPG
An inbound train at North Wilmington in August 2015
Location 370 Middlesex Avenue
Wilmington, MA 01887-2121
Coordinates 42°34′11″N 71°09′35″W / 42.5696°N 71.1597°W / 42.5696; -71.1597Coordinates: 42°34′11″N 71°09′35″W / 42.5696°N 71.1597°W / 42.5696; -71.1597
Line(s)
Platforms 1 side platform
Tracks 1
Construction
Parking 20 spaces (free)
Other information
Fare zone 3
History
Opened July 1, 1845
December 19, 1979[2]
Closed June 14, 1959[1]
Traffic
Passengers (2013) 310 (weekday inbound average)[3]
Services
Preceding station   MBTA.svg MBTA   Following station
Haverhill Line
toward Haverhill

North Wilmington is a regional rail station on the MBTA Commuter Rail Haverhill Line, located off Middlesex Avenue (MA-62) in Wilmington, Massachusetts. It has some of the most limited station faculties on the MBTA system - a single short bare platform serving the line's single track at the location, with a small parking lot and single bus shelter for passengers - but is a stop for all trains on the line. North Wilmington station is not handicapped accessible.

History[edit]

The Boston and Maine Railroad Extension opened on July 1, 1845 from Wilmington Junction to Boston, allowing the Boston and Maine Railroad a route into the city not dependent on the rival Boston and Lowell Railroad. A station was located at North Wilmington off Middlesex Avenue.[4] On June 14, 1959 the section from Reading to Wilmington Junction became freight-only, and Haverhill commuter trains as well as intercity service from New Hampshire and Maine were rerouted over the Wildcat Branch and the lower Lowell Line.[1] Salem Street stop on the Wildcat Branch opened to replace North Wilmington on the mainline.[2]

The lone remaining Haverhill trip was discontinued in June 1976. During the 1979 energy crisis, service was restored to Haverhill via the pre-1959 route, with several intermediate stops including North Wilmington returned to service.[2][1] Unlike the stops that had kept service until the 1970s, there was little left at North Wilmington. Like the similarly-hastily-built stations opened soon after on the Fitchburg Line, North Wilmington received a low asphalt platform and a small parking area, with a bus shelter added for passengers.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Humphrey, Thomas J. and Clark, Norton D. (1985). Boston's Commuter Rail: The First 150 Years. Boston Street Railway Association. pp. 55–70. ISBN 9780685412947. 
  2. ^ a b c Belcher, Jonathan (27 June 2015). "Changes to Transit Service in the MBTA district 1964-2015" (PDF). NETransit. Retrieved 28 August 2015. 
  3. ^ "Ridership and Service Statistics" (PDF) (14 ed.). Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority. 2014. Retrieved 28 August 2015. 
  4. ^ "Burlington & Wilmington & Woburn". George H. Walker & Co. 1889. Retrieved 28 August 2015. 

External links[edit]

Media related to North Wilmington (MBTA station) at Wikimedia Commons