North Wilmington (MBTA station)

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NORTH WILMINGTON
Inbound train at North Wilmington station, June 2015.JPG
An inbound train at North Wilmington in August 2015
Location 370 Middlesex Avenue
Wilmington, Massachusetts
Coordinates 42°34′11″N 71°09′35″W / 42.5696°N 71.1597°W / 42.5696; -71.1597Coordinates: 42°34′11″N 71°09′35″W / 42.5696°N 71.1597°W / 42.5696; -71.1597
Line(s)
Platforms 1 side platform
Tracks 1
Construction
Parking 20 spaces (free)
Other information
Fare zone 3
History
Opened July 1, 1845
December 19, 1979[2]
Closed June 14, 1959[1]
Traffic
Passengers (2013) 310 (weekday inbound average)[3]
Services
Preceding station   MBTA.svg MBTA   Following station
Haverhill Line
toward Haverhill

North Wilmington is a regional rail station on the MBTA Commuter Rail Haverhill Line, located off Middlesex Avenue (MA-62) in Wilmington, Massachusetts. It has some of the most limited station faculties on the MBTA system - a single short bare platform serving the line's single track at the location, with a small parking lot and single bus shelter for passengers - but is a stop for all trains on the line. North Wilmington station is not handicapped accessible.

History[edit]

North Wilmington station before it was destroyed by a 1914 fire

The Boston and Maine Railroad Extension opened on July 1, 1845 from Wilmington Junction to Boston, allowing the Boston and Maine Railroad a route into the city not dependent on the rival Boston and Lowell Railroad. A two-story wooden station was located at North Wilmington on the north side of Middlesex Avenue next to the northbound track, with a small shelter next to the southbound track.[4] The station building was destroyed in a fire caused by a defective chimney on October 26, 1914.[5] A small station building was constructed to replace it.

On June 14, 1959 the section from Reading to Wilmington Junction became freight-only, and Haverhill commuter trains as well as intercity service from New Hampshire and Maine were rerouted over the Wildcat Branch and the lower Lowell Line.[1] Salem Street stop on the Wildcat Branch opened to replace North Wilmington on the mainline.[2]

The lone remaining Haverhill trip was discontinued in June 1976. During the 1979 energy crisis, service was restored to Haverhill via the pre-1959 route, with several intermediate stops including North Wilmington returned to service.[2][1] Unlike the stops that had kept service until the 1970s, there was little left at North Wilmington. Like the similarly hastily built stations opened soon after on the Fitchburg Line, North Wilmington received a low asphalt platform and a small parking area, with a bus shelter added for passengers.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Humphrey, Thomas J. & Clark, Norton D. (1985). Boston's Commuter Rail: The First 150 Years. Boston Street Railway Association. pp. 55–70. ISBN 9780685412947. 
  2. ^ a b c Belcher, Jonathan (27 June 2015). "Changes to Transit Service in the MBTA district 1964-2015" (PDF). NETransit. Retrieved 28 August 2015. 
  3. ^ "Ridership and Service Statistics" (PDF) (14 ed.). Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority. 2014. Retrieved 28 August 2015. 
  4. ^ "Burlington & Wilmington & Woburn". George H. Walker & Co. 1889. Retrieved 28 August 2015. 
  5. ^ Butters, Albert D.; Foote, George F. (1915). "Fire Engineers' Report". Wilmington, Mass. Annual Report of the Town's Officers for the Financial Year Ending December 31, 1914. C. M. Barrows Co. p. 143 – via Internet Archive. 

External links[edit]

Media related to North Wilmington (MBTA station) at Wikimedia Commons