Old Aiken Post Office

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Old Aiken Post Office
Old Aiken PO.jpg
Old Aiken Post Office exterior, February 7th, 2010
Location 203 Laurens St. SW, Aiken, South Carolina, 29801
Coordinates 33°33′33.7″N 81°43′26.2″W / 33.559361°N 81.723944°W / 33.559361; -81.723944Coordinates: 33°33′33.7″N 81°43′26.2″W / 33.559361°N 81.723944°W / 33.559361; -81.723944
Built 1912[1]
Architectural style(s) Jeffersonian
Owner Todd Lista[2]
Old Aiken Post Office is located in South Carolina
Old Aiken Post Office
Location of Old Aiken Post Office in South Carolina
Old Aiken Post Office is located in the US
Old Aiken Post Office
Old Aiken Post Office (the US)

The Old Aiken Post Office, located in Aiken, South Carolina, is a former United States Post Office and photography studio[2] that now serves as an office building. The first floor of the building has been occupied by Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC since December 2009 following renovations.[1][3]

The building was originally proposed by U.S. Representative George W. Croft in 1904. After Croft's death, his son, U.S. Representative Theodore G. Croft, continued the project.[4] Over the years, the building has been occupied by numerous politicians, including U.S. Senator Strom Thurmond and South Carolina Senator Tom Young.[1]

History[edit]

U.S. Representative George W. Croft originally proposed the idea of building a post office in downtown Aiken in 1904. Upon Croft's death, his son Theodore G. Croft was elected to serve the remainder of his father's congressional term. Theodore Croft continued his father's work on getting the building built, and, with the help of U.S. Representatives J.O. Patterson and his successor James F. Byrnes, he secured $50,000 from the U.S. Congress for the building. Construction began in 1911[4] and was completed in 1912.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Old Aiken Post Office transformed into SRNS Aiken headquarters" (PDF). Savannah River Nuclear Solutions. Savannah River Nuclear Solutions. Retrieved 15 June 2017. 
  2. ^ a b Hale, Stephen Delaney (1 October 1995). "Federal building lives on". Carolina Chronicle. 
  3. ^ "2011 Historic Preservation Awards" (PDF). South Carolina Department of Archives & History. State Historic Preservation Office. Retrieved 15 June 2017. 
  4. ^ a b Lord, Philip (22 February 1990). "Old Aiken Post Office Sold". Aiken Standard.