Pa Pitt

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Father Pitt cele­brat­ing 1909 World Series win, drawn by Fred Johnston of the Leader.
Father Pitt cele­brat­ing 1909 World Series win, drawn by Fred Johnston of the Leader.

Pa Pitt, originally "Father Pitt", has been a personification of the city of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania since the 1890s.[1] Numerous editorial cartoonists have depicted "Pa Pitt" over the years, notably Pittsburgh Post-Gazette cartoonist Cy Hungerford.

A 1906 article by Raymond Gros lists seven cartoonists who had already drawn a 'Father Pitt', including Fred Johnston of the Leader whom Gros credits as creating 'Father Pitt' in 1895 to replace an earlier personification, 'Miss Pittsburgh'.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Thomas, Clarke M. (2005). Front-Page Pittsburgh: Two Hundred Years of the Post-Gazette. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press. p. 144; p. 319 footnote 8. ISBN 0-8229-4248-8. 
  2. ^ Gros, Raymond (6 October 1906). "Father Pitt in Cartoons". The Index. Pittsburgh: The Index Company. Archived from the original on 13 February 2012. Retrieved 12 October 2014 – via Internet Archive, via The Pennsylvania Department, Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh. 

External links[edit]