Patrick Minahan

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Patrick Joseph Minahan, KSS (27 March 1866 – 3 October 1933) was an Irish-born Australian politician.

He was born at Killaloe, County Clare to bootmaker Patrick Minahan and Mary, née Murphy. He arrived in New South Wales around 1883 and by 1888 had established a boot manufacturing business. In 1900 he married Catherine Kinsela, with whom he had five children; in 1915 he remarried Elizabeth Mary Ward and had a further two children. He became involved in the Australian Labor Party and was a member of the central executive from 1907 to 1913, serving as vice-president in 1909 and president in 1910. In 1910 he was elected to the New South Wales Legislative Assembly as the member for Belmore, but he lost preselection in 1917.

In 1920, with the introduction of proportional representation, he was elected as one of the members for Sydney. Defeated in 1925, he returned some months later after to fill the vacancy caused by John Birt's death. He was expelled from the Labor Party in 1927 and stood as an Independent Labor candidate, but was defeated. Minahan was later appointed a Knight of St. Sylvester by the Pope. He died at Lewisham in 1933.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Mr Patrick Joseph Minahan (1866–1933)". Former Members. Parliament of New South Wales. 2008. Retrieved 17 June 2012. 
Parliament of New South Wales
Preceded by
Edward O'Sullivan
Member for Belmore
1910–1917
Succeeded by
Michael Burke
Preceded by
New seat
Member for Sydney
1920–1925
Served alongside: Birt, Buckley/Jackson, Burke/McGirr, Levy
Succeeded by
Michael Burke
William Holdsworth
Preceded by
John Birt
Member for Sydney
1925–1927
Served alongside: Burke, Holdsworth, Jackson, Levy
Succeeded by
Seat abolished