Paul Wohl

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Paul Wohl (1901 – April 2, 1985) was a German-born journalist and political commentator.

Life[edit]

Born in Berlin, Wohl came to the United States as a correspondent for Czechoslovak newspapers. He worked for the Christian Science Monitor from 1941 until 1979, when he retired. He also contributed to the New York Herald Tribune.[1]

Agent for Walter Krivitsky[edit]

Wohl met Soviet spy Walter Krivitsky in the mid-1920s. When Krivitsky defected, Wohl became his literary agent in the United States. Together, they worked at times on his book, In Stalin's Secret Service (1939). At the time of publication, they argued about fees owed to Wohl and severed their connection.[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Paul Wohl, 84, journalist and commentator". Orlando Sentinel. April 5, 1985. Retrieved September 2, 2010. 
  2. ^ Krivitsky, Walter G. (2000). In Stalin's Secret Service: Memoirs of the First Soviet Master Spy to Defect. Enigma Books. ISBN 978-1-929631-38-4. 

External links[edit]

  • Krivitsky, Walter G. (2000). In Stalin's Secret Service: Memoirs of the First Soviet Master Spy to Defect. Enigma Books. ISBN 978-1-929631-38-4. 
  • Waldman, Louis (1944). Labor Lawyer. E. P. Dutton & Co. 
  • Kern, Gary (2004). A Death in Washington: Walter G. Krivitsky and the Stalin Terror. Enigma Books. ISBN 978-1-929631-25-4.