Pearsonomys

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Pearsonomys annectens
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Rodentia
Family: Cricetidae
Subfamily: Sigmodontinae
Tribe: Abrotrichini
Genus: Pearsonomys
Patterson, 1992
Species: P. annectens
Binomial name
Pearsonomys annectens
Patterson, 1992

Pearsonomys annectens, also known as Pearson's long-clawed akodont[2] or Pearson's long-clawed mouse,[3] is a species of rodent in the tribe Abrotrichini of family Cricetidae. It is the only species in the genus Pearsonomys. Molecular data suggests that its closest relative is Geoxus valdivianus.[4] This rodent is endemic to Chile, where it is found in Nothofagus forest of the Valdivian temperate rainforest ecoregion.[1] The genus is named after American zoologist Oliver Payne Pearson.[5][6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Patterson, B.; D'elia, G. (2008). "Pearsonomys annectens". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. IUCN. 2008: e.T40768A10363765. Retrieved 3 November 2015. 
  2. ^ Musser, G.G.; Carleton, M.D. (2005). "Superfamily Muroidea". In Wilson, D.E.; Reeder, D.M. Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference (3rd ed.). Johns Hopkins University Press. p. 1160. ISBN 978-0-8018-8221-0. OCLC 62265494. 
  3. ^ Duff, A.; Lawson, A. (2004-07-11). Mammals of the World: A checklist. New Haven, Connecticut: Yale University Press. p. 63. ISBN 0-7136-6021-X. OCLC 56204329. 
  4. ^ Musser, G.G.; Carleton, M.D. (2005). "Genus Geoxus". In Wilson, D.E.; Reeder, D.M. Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference (3rd ed.). Johns Hopkins University Press. p. 1116. ISBN 978-0-8018-8221-0. OCLC 62265494. 
  5. ^ Lidicker, W. Z.; Patton, J. L. "In Memoriam: Oliver Payne Pearson". Online Biographies of UC Faculty and Administrators. University of California. Retrieved 2012-05-11. 
  6. ^ Beolens, Bo; Watkins, Michael; Grayson, Michael (2009-09-28). The Eponym Dictionary of Mammals. The Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 312–313. ISBN 978-0801893049. OCLC 270129903.