Pereira v. United States

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Pereira v. United States
Seal of the United States Supreme Court.svg
Argued October 20, 1953
Decided February 1, 1954
Full case name Pereira, et al. v. United States
Citations 347 U.S. 1 (more)
74 S. Ct. 358; 98 L. Ed. 435; 1954 U.S. LEXIS 2623
Holding
The word "knowingly" in the federal mail fraud statute (18 U.S.C. §1341) should extend to all reasonably foreseeable consequences, even ones not specifically intended.
Court membership
Case opinions
Majority Warren, joined by Frankfurter, Jackson, Burton, Clark
Concur/dissent Minton, joined by Black, Douglas
Reed took no part in the consideration or decision of the case.

Pereira v. United States, 347 U.S. 1 (1954), was a United States Supreme Court case in which the Court held that the word "knowingly" in the federal mail fraud statute (18 U.S.C. §1341) should extend to all reasonably foreseeable consequences, even ones not specifically intended.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bonnie, R.J. et al. Criminal Law, Second Edition. Foundation Press, New York, NY: 2004, p. 187

External links[edit]