Pete Meegan

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Pete Meegan
Pitcher
Born: (1862-11-13)November 13, 1862
San Francisco
Died: March 15, 1905(1905-03-15) (aged 42)
San Francisco
Batted: Unknown Threw: Unknown
MLB debut
August 12, 1884, for the Richmond Virginians
Last MLB appearance
October 1, 1885, for the Pittsburg Alleghenys
MLB statistics
Win–loss record 14–20
earned run average 3.90
Strikeouts 164
Teams

Peter James Meegan (November 13, 1862 – March 15, 1905), also known as "Steady" Pete,[1] was an American Major League Baseball player who pitched for two seasons; one with the 1884 Richmond Virginians, and the other for the 1885 Pittsburg Alleghenys, both of the American Association.

Early life and career[edit]

Meegan was born on November 13, 1862 in San Francisco, California, to Lawrence and Ann Meegan who were Irish refugees from the Great Famine, who had moved from Boston to San Francisco prior to the American Civil War with Ann’s sister Bridget and her husband John Brady—who were the great-great-grandparents of the American football quarterback for the New England Patriots of the National Football League (NFL) Tom Brady—and lived together as next door neighbors in the Mission District.[2][3]

Meegan made his major league debut for Richmond on August 12, 1884, when the Virginians joined the Association as a late season replacement team. He started 22 games that season, completed all of them, and threw one shutout. In 179 innings pitched, he struck out 106 batters, and had a 4.32 ERA along with a 7-12 win-loss record.[4] After the season ended, the Virginians folded.

For the 1885 season, Meegan joined the Pittsburg Alleghenys, and had a 7-8 win-loss record in 18 games pitched. He started 16 of those games, completed 14, and recorded one shutout. He also struck out 58 batters in 146 innings pitched. This was his last Major League season.[5]

Post-career[edit]

Meegan died in his hometown of San Francisco at the age of 42, and is interred at Holy Cross Cemetery in Colma, California.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Miller, Patrick B. (2002). The Sporting World of the Modern South. University of Illinois Press. p. 77. ISBN 0-252-07036-4. Retrieved 2008-12-16. 
  2. ^ "Tom Brady's roots run deep into 19th-century Boston". The Boston Globe. March 4, 2017. Retrieved March 6, 2017. 
  3. ^ "Tom Brady connection to Irish Famine ancestors from Boston discovered". IrishCentral. March 6, 2017. Retrieved March 6, 2017. 
  4. ^ a b "Pete Meegan's career statistics". retrosheet.org. Retrieved 2008-12-16. 
  5. ^ "Pete Meegan's career statistics". baseball-reference.com. Retrieved 2008-12-16. 

External links[edit]