Petter Gottschalk

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Petter Gottschalk (born March 27, 1950) is a Norwegian professor of IT strategy employed at the BI Norwegian Business School at its Institute for Leadership and Organizational Management.[1]

He is educated Diplom-Kaufmann from Berlin Institute of Technology, Master of Science from Dartmouth College and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Doctor of Business Administration from Henley Management College and Brunel University.[1]

Gottschalk has previously been CEO of Norwegian Computing Center, ABB Datakabel, Statens kantiner and Norsk Informasjonsteknologi (NIT).[1]

In recent years, Gottschalk has done research on the police and their use of IT. He has also done much research on knowledge management, and he has published a number of books on that subject, as well as books about the police. He has also worked as an advisor to the police. His research on the police and their use of information technology has resulted in his appearance in the news media when this topic has been in the news. Gottschalk also researches crime as seen from the police perspective, in particular organized crime and financial crime. In recent years, he has published many articles as well as a number of books in English about organized crime, financial crime and criminal entrepreneurship. Gottschalk was an active participant in the Norwegian public discourse about EU's Data Retention Directive in 2010 expressing his opinion that the police ought to make better use of the sources they already have.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Petter Gottschalk" (in Norwegian). BI Norwegian Business School. Archived from the original on March 30, 2012. Retrieved March 30, 2012. 
  2. ^ Oreld, Michael (March 15, 2010). "- Politiet trenger ikke lagringsdirektiv" [- The police do not need the Data Retention Directive]. Computerworld Norway (in Norwegian). Retrieved March 30, 2012.