Phelsuma abbotti pulchra

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Phelsuma abotti pulchra
Scientific classification e
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Reptilia
Order: Squamata
Family: Gekkonidae
Genus: Phelsuma
Species: P. abbotti
Subspecies: P. a. pulchra
Trinomial name
Phelsuma abbotti pulchra
Rendahl, 1939

Phelsuma abbotti pulchra Rendahl, 1939 is a subspecies of geckos. It typically lives near human settlements on Cousine Island. Phelsuma abbotti pulchra feeds on insects and nectar.

Scientific synonyms[edit]

  • Phelsuma abbotti pulchra - Hoesch, 1982
  • Phelsuma longinsulae pulchra Rendahl, 1939

Description[edit]

This lizard belongs to the middle sized day geckos. It can reach a total length of about 15 cm. The body colour is grass green or olive green. A rost-coloured stripe extends from the nostril to behind the eye. On the back there are brownish or red-brick coloured dots which typically form three line along the back.

Distribution[edit]

This subspecies is only known from the Seychelles island Cousine-Island.

Habitat[edit]

Phelsuma abbotti pulchra typically lives near human settlements. They preferably inhabit mango and banana trees. Often, many individuals can be found on one tree. This day gecko share their habitat with Phelsuma astriata astriata.

Diet[edit]

These day geckos feed on various insects and other invertebrates. They also like to lick soft, sweet fruit, pollen and nectar.

Behaviour[edit]

These Phelsumas often live in small groups with one male and several females per tree. Young males may also be tolerated.

Reproduction[edit]

The pairing season is between November and the first weeks of April. During this period, the females lay up to 6 pairs of eggs. At a temperature of 28°C, the young will hatch after approximately 55 days. The juveniles measure 55–60 mm.

Care and maintenance in captivity[edit]

These animals are quite active and therefore should be housed in pairs and need a large, well planted terrarium. In captivity, these animals can be fed with crickets, wax moth, fruits flies, mealworms and houseflies.


References[edit]

  • Henkel, F.-W. and W. Schmidt (1995) Amphibien und Reptilien Madagaskars, der Maskarenen, Seychellen und Komoren. Ulmer Stuttgart. ISBN 3-8001-7323-9
  • McKeown, Sean (1993) The general care and maintenance of day geckos. Advanced Vivarium Systems, Lakeside CA.