Philip McNairy

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The Right Reverend
Philip Frederick McNairy
VI Bishop of Minnesota
Province The Episcopal Church Flag of the US Episcopal Church.svg
Diocese Minnesota
Successor Robert Marshall Anderson
Personal details
Born March 19, 1911
Lake City, Minnesota
Died December 8, 1989

Philip Frederick McNairy was the Sixth Bishop of Minnesota in The Episcopal Church.

Philip Frederick McNairy was born in 1911 in Lake City, Minnesota, to Harry Doughty McNairy and Clara Moseman McNairy. He attended Kenyon College where he was a member of Sigma Pi fraternity and attended seminary at Bexley Hall. He married Cary Elizabeth Fleming in November 1935 and they had three children.[1]

Rev. McNairy was ordained a Deacon in May 1934 and a Priest in April 1935. He began his active ministry at St. Andrew's Mission in Columbus, Ohio. He subsequently became rector of St. Stephen's in Cincinnati, and in 1940 went to St. Paul, Minnesota as rector of Christ Church. During his decade in St. Paul he was active as: president of University House Corporation, the directing body for Episcopal work on the campus at the University of Minnesota; president of the Council of Social Agencies and the St. Paul Council of Human Relations; and chairman of the department of Christian education in the diocese.[2]

In 1950 he became Dean of St. Paul’s Cathedral in Buffalo, NY. While in Buffalo he gave a series of radio addresses. Some of these addresses he used as the foundation for his book “Family Story” which was published in 1960.[3]

He served as Suffragan Bishop of Minnesota from 1958-1968, Bishop Coadjutor of Minnesota from 1968-1970. He was elected Bishop of Minnesota in 1971 and served until his retirement in 1977.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Bishop Philip F. McNairy files". Minnesota Historical Society. 
  2. ^ "Four Bishops" (PDF). The Emerald of Sigma Pi. Vol. 44 no. 4. Winter 1958. pp. 211–212. 
  3. ^ "Kirkus Review". Kirkus. 

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