Poeas

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

In Greek mythology, Poeas, or Poias was one of the Argonauts and a friend of Heracles. His father was named Thaumacus.[1]

As an Argonaut, Poeas is identified as the greatest archer of the group. When facing the giant Talos, some accounts say Medea drugged the bronze giant and Poeas shot an arrow to poison him in his heel.[2] Other sources cited his son Philoctetes as one of the Argonauts instead of him.[3]

More famously, Poeas had a role in the apotheosis of Heracles. When Heracles realized he was dying from poisonous centaur blood he demanded a funeral pyre built and lit once he stood atop it. Yet, none of his own men would light the pyre, a passer-by (Poeas) was asked by Heracles to light the pyre. In return for this favor Heracles bestowed his famed bow and poison arrows upon Poeas.[4] Other versions had his son Philoctetes as the passer-by or that Poeas assigned Philoctetes the task.

Poeas was also the king of Meliboea in Thessaly.

Reference[edit]

  1. ^ Apollodorus. The Library 1.9.16.
  2. ^ Apollodorus. The Library Book 1.9.26
  3. ^ Hyginus. Fables 14 translated and edited by Mary Grant. University of Kansas Publications in Humanistic Studies, no. 34. Lawrence: University of Kansas Press, 1960.
  4. ^ Apollodorus. The Library, Book 2.7.7

Source[edit]

  • Apollodorus, The Library with an English Translation by Sir James George Frazer, F.B.A., F.R.S. in 2 Volumes. Cambridge, MA, Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann Ltd. 1921. Includes Frazer's notes.
  • Hyginus. Fables translated and edited by Mary Grant. University of Kansas Publications in Humanistic Studies, no. 34. Lawrence: University of Kansas Press, 1960.