Political hack

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

A political hack is a negative term ascribed to a person who is part of the political party apparatus, but whose intentions are more aligned with victory than personal conviction. The term "hired gun" is often used in tandem to further describe the moral bankruptcy of the "hack". When a group of political hacks of a similar political affiliation get together, they are sometimes called a political hack pack.[1] When one side of a debate has more political hacks than the other, this is referred to as a "hack gap" and gives an advantage to the side with more political hacks.[2][3]


  1. ^ Voges, Angela (2014). Brain Porn: Best of the Daily Maverick. Cape Town: Tafelberg. ISBN 9780624070672. 
  2. ^ Chalt, Jonathan (2011-06-22). "The Hack Gap". The New Republic. Retrieved 2015-09-24. 
  3. ^ Serwer, Adam (2011-06-22). "Media gave Bush pass on `torture,’ but clobbers Obama over Libya `hostilities’". The Washington Post. Retrieved 2015-09-24.