Princess Maria of Romania (1870–1874)

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For other people named Maria of Romania, see Maria of Romania (disambiguation).
Princess Maria
Princess of Romania
Printesa Maria a Romaniei.jpg
Princess Maria, c. 1873.
Born 8 September [O.S. 27 August] 1870
Bucharest, Romania
Died 9 April [O.S. 28 March] 1874 (aged 3)
Peleş Castle, Sinaia, Romania
Burial Cotroceni Palace (1874–1916)
Curtea de Argeș Cathedral (1916–present)
Full name
Principesa Maria a României
House House of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen
Father Carol I of Romania
Mother Elisabeth of Wied
Religion Romanian Orthodox[1]

Princess Maria/Marie of Romania (Maria/Marie von Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen, 8 September 1870 – 9 April 1874) was the only child of Carol I of Romania and his wife, Elisabeth of Wied.

Life[edit]

Princess Maria was born in Bucharest as the first Princess of Romania that was also of the House of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen, on 8 September [O.S. 27 August] 1870. After a month, in October [O.S. September] 1870, she was baptised as a Romanian Orthodox at the monastery of Cotroceni (near the site of the present-day Cotroceni Palace).[1] In her family, the young princess was nicknamed "Mariechen"[1] (a possible homage to her parents' German heritage) or "Itty".[2] Everyone who knew Maria described her as a beautiful and precocious young child, as she was said to look at maps and identify different countries for fun at the age of only two and a half.[1] It is said that sometime before she died, Princess Maria told her mother that she would someday like to be able to ride a star.[2]

Maria had no prospect of inheriting her father's throne; the 1866 Constitution limited succession to males.

Death[edit]

On 5 April [O.S. 24 March] 1874,[1] the Princess became ill with scarlet fever. An epidemic had been ravaging the capital at the time. She was immediately transported to the Peleş Castle. Despite being treated with much care by a doctor named Theodori and many others,[1] the young princess expired on 9 April [O.S. 28 March] 1874 and was buried at the monastery of Cotroceni. At Elisabeth's request, Maria's tombstone read the Bible verse, Luke 8:52:

The funeral service took place at the Cotroceni Church within the grounds of the Cotroceni Royal Palace.[3] The coffin was covered with white satin, criss-crossed with silver lace ornaments and was as large as one for an adult, because the infant princess' body was enclosed in several decreasing size caskets placed one inside another. After the religious service in the Romanian Orthodox rite, the cortege walked through the palace gardens to the burial place next to the palace church. Those gardens were the favorite playing grounds for the young princess, where only half a dozen days previously she had played with her nurse.[3]

Legacy[edit]

Her parents were devastated by her death. On 5 May that year, Carol wrote to Charles Anthony, Prince of Hohenzollern that they intended to move to the Cotroceni Palace, in order to be closer to the resting place of their infant daughter:

In another letter to Lascăr Catargiu,[3] he wrote:

The death of their only child worsened the relationship between Carol and Elisabeth and they did not have any further children. In 1875, Karl Storck created a bust of the sleeping princess which was erected by her tomb. This bust inspired Elisabeth to write many emotional poems.[1] When Queen Elisabeth died in 1916, according to her wishes, her daughter's remains were exhumed and the casket placed on her coffin for the public procession. Mother and daughter were then buried together in the same tomb at the Cathedral of Curtea de Argeș.[1] At the Elisabeta Palace, one can still see an 1880s style piece of furniture that contains a plaster-mold of the infant princess.[2]

Gallery[edit]

Ancestors[edit]

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
16. Anton Aloys, Prince of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
8. Charles, Prince of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
17. Princess Amalie Zephyrine of Salm-Kyrburg
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
4. Charles Anthony, Prince of Hohenzollern
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
18. Peter Murat
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
9. Marie Antoinette Murat
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
19. Louise d'Astorg
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
2. Carol I of Romania
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
20. Charles Louis, Hereditary Prince of Baden
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
10. Karl, Grand Duke of Baden
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
21. Landgravine Amalie of Hesse-Darmstadt
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
5. Princess Josephine of Baden
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
22. Claude de Beauharnais, Count of Les Roches-Baritaud
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
11. Stéphanie de Beauharnais
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
23. Claudine de Lézay-Marnésia
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1. Princess Marie of Romania
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
24. Friedrich Karl, Prince of Wied
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
12. Johann August Karl, Prince of Wied
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
25. Countess Marie of Sayn-Wittgenstein-Berleburg
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
6. Hermann, Prince of Wied
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
26. Wilhelm, Prince of Solms-Braunfels
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
13. Princess Sophie Auguste of Solms-Braunfels
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
27. Countess Auguste Franziska of Salm-Grumbach
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
3. Princess Elisabeth of Wied
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
28. Frederick William, Prince of Nassau-Weilburg
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
14. William, Duke of Nassau
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
29. Burgravine Louise Isabelle of Kirchberg
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
7. Princess Marie of Nassau
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
30. Frederick, Duke of Saxe-Altenburg
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
15. Princess Louise of Saxe-Hildburghausen
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
31. Duchess Charlotte Georgine of Mecklenburg-Strelitz
 
 
 
 
 
 

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i A history in pictures, p. 13/14
  2. ^ a b c (Romanian) Principesa Marioara
  3. ^ a b c d e Mandache, Diana (2011-11-11). "Maria of Hohenzollern, the Romanian daughter of King Carol I". lostinthemythsofhistory.blogspot.com. Retrieved 2011-12-18. 

Bibliography[edit]