Principality of Upper Hungary

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Principality of Upper Hungary

Felső-Magyarországi Fejedelemség
Orta Macar
1682–1685
Principality of Upper Hungary in 1683
Principality of Upper Hungary in 1683
StatusVassal state of the Ottoman Empire
CapitalKassa (present-day Košice)
GovernmentPrincipality
Prince 
History 
• Established
November 19, 1682
• Disestablished
October 15, 1685
ISO 3166 codeHU
Preceded by
Succeeded by
Kingdom of Hungary (1526–1867)
Kingdom of Hungary (1526–1867)
Today part ofHungary, Romania, Slovakia, Ukraine

The Principality of Upper Hungary[1] (Hungarian: Felső-Magyarországi Fejedelemség; Turkish: Orta Macar, "Middle Hungary") was a short lived Ottoman vassal state ruled by Imre Thököly.

Background[edit]

The region of Upper Hungary was considered to be an appanage principality, and it was usually managed by the heir of Hungarian throne, or by a brother of the reigning king. This territory would be administrated from the city of Pozsony (German: Pressburg, today's Bratislava).[2] After peace treaty of Vasvár was signed in 1664, loyalty felt by Hungarians towards Habsburg dynasty was in decline. Imperial administration acted against interests of the Hungarian estates. In 1671 a rebellion was successfully thwarted. However, a year later Mihály Teleki led a more successful rebellion. In 1680 Imre Thököly became the leading figure of the rebellion. These rebellions were supported and sustained by the Ottoman state and the Principality of Transylvania.[3][4]

Establishment and later history[edit]

The principality was established on 19 November 1682.[5] The polity agreed to pay 20,000 gold[clarification needed] to the Ottomans annually.[6] In 1685 Thököly was defeated at Eperjes (present-day Prešov) and the Turks imprisoned him because of his previous negotiations with Leopold therefore his realm ceased to exist.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hadtörténelmi közlemények, Volume 118, Issues 3-4, Hadtörténeti Intézet és Múzeum, 2005, p. 409
  2. ^ William Mahoney (18 February 2011). The History of the Czech Republic and Slovakia. ABC-CLIO. p. 34. ISBN 978-0-313-36306-1.
  3. ^ Balázs Trencsényi; Márton Zászkaliczky (2010). Whose Love of Which Country?: Composite States, National Histories and Patriotic Discourses in Early Modern East Central Europe. BRILL. p. 547. ISBN 90-04-18262-4.
  4. ^ István Keul (2009). Early Modern Religious Communities in East-Central Europe: Ethnic Diversity, Denominational Plurality, and Corporative Politics in the Principality of Transylvania (1526-1691). BRILL. p. 219. ISBN 90-04-17652-7.
  5. ^ J. János Varga, A fogyó félhold árnyékában, Gondolat, Budapest, 1986, p. 31
  6. ^ "Kereszt és félhold". mek.oszk.hu.