Quaedam narracio

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Quaedam narracio de Groninghe, de Thrente, de Covordia et de diversis aliis sub diversis episcopis Traiectensibus ("A Certain Narrative of Groningen, Drenthe, Coevorden and of Various Other Issues under Various Bishops of Utrecht"),[1] usually just Quaedam narracio for short, is an anonymous Latin prose chronicle written in 1232–33 by a Frisian clergyman attached to Bishop Willibrand of Utrecht.[2] It was written during the Drenther uprising of 1227–1232.[3]

The Quaedam narracio is found in the Liber donationum (Book of Donations) of Utrecht Cathedral (now Utrecht, Gemeentearchief, Archief van het Domkapittel, inv. 52A). This manuscript contains a record of donations made to the cathedral and also another short historical narrative, the Bella Campestria.[4] The Quaedam narracio is divided into forty short chapters (headings) covering the bishops of Utrecht from Hartbert (r. 1139–1150) down to the reigning bishop, Willibrand. It is chiefly concerned with the bishops' efforts to assert and extend their authority in the regions of Coevorden, Drenthe and Groningen and with their conflicts with the counties of Holland and Guelders.[1]

Editions[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Justine Smithuis (2016), "Quaedam narracio [de Groninghe, de Thrente, de Covordia et de diversis aliis sub diversis episcopis Traiectensibus"], in Graeme Dunphy and Cristian Bratu (eds.), Encyclopedia of the Medieval Chronicle (Leiden: Brill). Consulted online on 7 November 2019.
  2. ^ O. Vries (2015), "Frisonica libertas: Frisian Freedom as an Instance of Medieval Liberty", Journal of Medieval History, 41(2): 229–248. doi:10.1080/03044181.2015.1034162
  3. ^ Bas J. P. van Bavel (2010), "Rural Revolts and Structural Change in the Low Countries, Thirteenth – Early Fourteenth Centuries", in Richard Goddard; John Langdon; Miriam Müller (eds.), Survival and Discord in Medieval Society: Essays in Honour of Christopher Dyer (Turnhout: Brepols), pp. 249–268.
  4. ^ Antheun Janse (2016), "Bella Campestria", in Graeme Dunphy and Cristian Bratu (eds.), Encyclopedia of the Medieval Chronicle (Leiden: Brill). Consulted online on 7 November 2019.