Raglan Chronicle

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Raglan Chronicle
April-May 2006 Raglan Chronicle change.JPG
The last A4 edition was in April, and the first tabloid, in May 2006.
TypeWeekly newspaper
FormatTabloid
Owner(s)Raglan Ink Ltd
EditorMaki Nishiyama
Founded1903
HeadquartersRaglan, Waikato region
Circulationabout 2,000
Website[1]

The Raglan Chronicle, formerly the Raglan County Chronicle, is a free weekly newspaper published in Raglan and delivered to most homes west of the summit of State Highway 23. Circulation figures are not published, but the 2013 Census showed 1,143 dwellings in Raglan and 681 in Te Uku area units,[1] in addition to which copies are available in Raglan shops and cafes, so that total circulation must amount to about 2,000 copies a week. In addition copies can be downloaded from the website.

This is how the history of the Chronicle was presented in the 1940 Centennial Souvenir Booklet[2] -

"In 1903 an event took place which did much for the progress of our district. This was no less than the formation of the Raglan Printing and Publishing Coy., which had for its object the inauguration of a weekly local paper. The first editor was Mr. F. W. Green under whose able management a wide and flourishing circulation was achieved and the venture paid a good dividend to its shareholders. In those days when the only telephones were those in the post offices local news travelled very slowly and often came to residents through the medium only of the Auckland Weekly News, Waikato Times, Waikato Argus or notices at post office or public notice boards, one of which was situated at the Kauroa-Okete cross-roads. Now all this was changed and a paper devoted solely to Raglan news and interests was a great boon and was eagerly looked forward to each week. In every home there was a rush for the Chronicle or "The Buster" as it was affectionately called by many."

1903-13

A Te Mata farmer, Frank W. Green was the first editor and ran the Raglan County Chronicle for over 10 years. He was also on the Raglan Town Board when it was formed in 1906, resigning in 1907, to become its first Town Clerk. In 1913 Frank left the district and passed the Chronicle to Roy Donaldson for the rest of the year.[3]

1913-19

The Rev. Greenwell Carr then became proprietor and editor. He was Congregational Church minister from 1898 to 1917, came from Denniston and spoke with a broad North Country accent. Increasing deafness caused him to resign from the ministry, though he continued to take services when other ministers were not available. From 1913 until 1938 he too was Town Clerk and from 1915-20 he was secretary of the Raglan Dairy Co.[3]

Gerald Griffiths who was farming at Kauroa took over the Chronicle after returning from the war, about 1919.[3]

1920-35

Dr W.M. Sanders and his wife ran the Chronicle for about 15 years and lived in a house behind the Bow St office. He had been a schoolteacher in Taranaki, before training as a doctor and became Raglan's first doctor. On 15 February 1906, Raglan ratepayers, with Dr. W. M. Sanders in the chair, decided set up a committee to map out a township area get a petition to form Raglan Town Board. Dr Sanders was one of 5 elected unopposed. The Board met at the Chronicle office until the Town Hall was built. Dr Sanders was master of the Masonic lodge in 1912. In 1913 Dr Stewart Moore took over the practice, whilst Dr Sanders moved to Frankton[4] and then to Tonga. In 1916 Dr Sanders returned to Raglan, but sold the practice to Dr. Cashmore in the early 20s. Dr Sanders‚ last home was on the hill, surrounded by a garden and orchard, fronting James and Bow Streets. St Peters church is built on land donated by Dr Sanders in 1922. Then Jack Eggelston and later Mr. Keay and his son Winton managed the business. In 1927 the original office, next to the Town Hall, was burnt down, together with the hall and a draper's shop.[5] It was rebuilt across the road. For the years 1936-38 Ron Pearce managed it for the Sanders Estate.[3]

1938-44

The Chronicle was then sold to C.H. Marcroft. The Centennial Booklet said, "Mr. C. H. Marcroft, came to the rescue and has succeeded in again making the paper the medium of interest and progress it was meant to be when it was started so enthusiastically 37 years ago." He moved to Tauranga in 1944.[3]

1944-59

Ron Pearce, who had managed the Chronicle in the mid 30s, bought the business in 1944. He sold it to Ian Thomson in 1950, but in 1952 Ian had a serious car accident and Ron took over and ran it again until 1959. Ron was master of the Masonic lodge in 1956.[3]

1959-63

Bill Racke was the last editor,[3] ceasing publication on 24 April 1963. In 1963 a few copies of the Raglan Rally came out.

In 1967 the disused Chronicle Office building was purchased for a Jehovah's Witnesses meeting place. The casements were removed and a brick front built. It has since seen several uses and became Raglan Gym in 2011.

1988-1997

In the late 1980s, under the influence of Eva Rickard, Whaingaroa Kite Whenua Trust, as part of its training for unemployed youth, ran an Office Skills training module. Mike Bell was their literacy and numeracy tutor and assisted students to develop and conduct a survey asking Raglan residents about community needs. Most clearly identified was the need for a local newspaper. Mike initiated the creation and publication of the first edition of the Raglan New Chronicle in August 1988 and continued to edit and grow the publication over the following eight years. Delivery was by volunteers. Publication and editing was passed on to the Brownlees in 1996.

In 1997 Stephen and Tracy Frew took over and, in April 2004, the Chronicle once again got an office on Bow St in the former petrol station shop and dropped the 'New' title.[6] Another new development was the web site, so that the paper was regularly read in UK, US and Australia.[7]

April 2006 saw further change, as David and Jacqui Smith became editors and the Chronicle appeared for the first time in colour and reverted to tabloid format (see photo above). In September 2007 the Chronicle office moved to 2 Wainui Rd (see street scene on https://maps.google.com/). The paper moved upstairs,[8] next door, in October 2016.[9]

External links[edit]

  • Raglan museum has 8 Chronicle images on its website [2]

The museum has these back numbers -

1903 Oct 2, 16; 1904 Apr 8, Sep 30, Oct 21, Nov 18; 1905 Jun 23; 1906 Mar 16; 1911 July 21; 1913 July 31; 1915 Oct 7; 1916 Apr 13, 27; 1924 Sep 3; 1925 Jan 21, Oct 7, Nov 11; 1931 May 18; 1932 May 18, Feb 21; 1934 to 5 June 1935 bound vols; 1943 Feb 4; 1944-45 bound vol; 1946 Apr 11; 1948 bound vol; 1949 May 5, Oct 20, Nov 24; 1957 Jan 31, Feb 7, 14, 21, 28, Mar 7, 14, 21, 28, Apr 4, 11, 18, 26, May 2, 9, 16, 30, Jun 6, 13, 20, 27, Jul 4, 11, 18, 25, Aug 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, Sep 5, 12, 19, 26, Oct 3, 10, 17, 24. 31, Nov 7, 14, 28, Dec 5, 12, 19; 1958 Jan 16, 30, Feb 8, 20, 27, Mar 6, 13, 20, 27, Apr 2, 10, 17, 24, May 1, 8, 15, 22, Jun 5, 12, 19, 26, Jul 3, 10. 17, 24, 31, Aug 7, 21, 28, Sep 4, 11, 18, 25, Oct 2, 9, 16, 23, 30, Nov 6, 13, 20, 27, Dec 4, 11, 18, 23; 1959 Jan 15, 29, Feb 5, 19, 22, 27, Mar 5, 12, 19, 26, Apr 3, 9, 16, 23, 30, May 11, 21, 28, Jun 4, 11, 18, 25, Jul 2, 9, 16, 23, 30, Aug 6, 13, 20, 27, Sep 3, 10, 17, 24, Oct 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, Nov 5, 12, 19. 26, Dec 3, 10, 24; 1960 Dec 1; 1961 Mar 23; 1962 Feb 22, May 10, Jun 14, Sep 27, Oct 4, Dec 6, 20; 1963 Jan 17, Apr 24 (last)

Raglan Rally 1963 Oct 19, Nov 28

References[edit]

  1. ^ "2013 Census map – QuickStats about a place". archive.stats.govt.nz. Retrieved 8 April 2018.
  2. ^ 1940 Centennial Souvenir Booklet
  3. ^ a b c d e f g Chapter 23 Raglan by R T Vernon 1975
  4. ^ Waikato Argus 26 June 1913
  5. ^ Evening Post, Volume CXIII, Issue 65, 18 March 1927, Page 5 http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/
  6. ^ http://nlnzcat.natlib.govt.nz/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=878846
  7. ^ http://nlnzcat.natlib.govt.nz/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=932789
  8. ^ "Gypsy time in the Raglan CBD". www.raglan23.co.nz. Retrieved 30 April 2017.
  9. ^ "Raglan Chronicle". issuu. 13 October 2016. Retrieved 30 April 2017.