Rice Owen Clark

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Rice Owen Clark (1862)

Rice Owen Clark (1816 – 16 June 1896) was an English settler in New Zealand, establishing a brickworks at Hobsonville that was the origin of Crown Lynn and Ceramco.

Biography[edit]

Clark was baptised in the parish of Great Marlow, Buckinghamshire, England, on 19 September 1816, the son of Josiah and Ann Clark[1] and the brother of engineers Edwin Clark and Josiah Latimer Clark.[2] He emigrated to New Zealand on the Gertrude, arriving at Port Nicholson on 31 October 1841.[3] He ran a church school in Wellington, but it was destroyed by earthquake and he subsequently moved to Auckland.[4]

In 1854 Clark bought land in Hobsonville, becoming one of the first European settlers in the area. It was there that he set up a prosperous business making drain pipes, bricks and tiles for the increasing number of settlers.[5] Much of the clay he used was being sourced from Limeburners Bay, which is now an archaeological site.[6]

When he was 33 years old, Clark was accused of bigamy at the Wellington Supreme Court, but he was found not guilty.[7]

Clark died at his home in Hobsonville on 16 June 1896,[8] and was buried at Hobsonville Cemetery.[9]

Legacy[edit]

In 1908 Clark's Potteries became R.O. Clark Limited.[10] His great-grandson, Tom Clark, inherited the business setting up a ceramics company which eventually became known as Crown Lynn Potteries Ltd.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "England, select births and christenings, 1538–1975". Ancestry.com Operations. 2014. Retrieved 20 February 2016. (subscription required (help)). 
  2. ^ "Obituary". New Zealand Herald. 10 July 1896. p. 3. Retrieved 20 February 2016. 
  3. ^ "Settlers advanced search". Hutt City Council. Retrieved 20 February 2016. 
  4. ^ David Pearson Architects (August 2012). "Clark Cottage, Hobsonville, Auckland: a conservation plan" (PDF). Retrieved 20 February 2016. 
  5. ^ NZ Historic Brick Database, Retrieved 1 September 2012
  6. ^ The Aucklander: Heritage has day in court, Retrieved 1 September 2012
  7. ^ New Zealand Lost Cases Project, 1 September 1849, Retrieved 1 September 2012
  8. ^ "Deaths". New Zealand Herald. 24 June 1896. p. 1. Retrieved 20 February 2016. 
  9. ^ Gray, Matthew (15 February 2009). "Not the 'woman' he thought he was" (PDF). Western Leader. p. 9. Retrieved 20 February 2016. 
  10. ^ New Zealand Historical Places: Clark House, Retrieved 1 September 2012

References[edit]

  • Clough, R. 2006. Hobsonville Limeburners Bay, Proposed Subdivision Dp104222: Archaeological Assessment. Unpublished Report.