Richard Fairclough (divine)

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Richard Fairclough (1621–1682) was an English nonconformist divine.

Life[edit]

Fairclough was the eldest son of Samuel Fairclough (1594–1677). He graduated M.A. as a member of Emmanuel College, Cambridge.[1] While a resident in Thames Street, London, he was licensed in 1672 to be a general presbyterian teacher.

He died in London 4 July 1682 and was buried in Bunhill Fields. According to John Howe, Fairclough was "a man of a clear, distinct understanding, of a very quick, discerning, and penetrating judgment, that would on a sudden … strike through knotty difficulties into the inward center of truth with such a felicity that things seem'd to offer themselves to him which are wont to cost others a troublesome search."

He was author of "The nature, possibility, and duty of a true believer attaining to a certain knowledge of his effectual vocation, eternal election, and final perseverance to glory", a sermon printed in Nathaniel Vincent's The Morning-Exercise against Popery, 1675, and in vol. vi. of Samuel Annesley's The Morning Exercises, 1844, &c. Edmund Calamy also mentions 'An Abridgment of some of his latter Sermons to his beloved people at Mells'.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Fairclough, Richard (FRCH637R)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge. 

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain"Fairclough, Richard". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900.