Richard Kiser

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Richard Kiser
Born (1947-02-23) February 23, 1947 (age 74)
OriginSalem, Virginia
GenresGospel music, Inspirational
Occupation(s)Christian music guitarist
InstrumentsGuitar
Years active1969–present
WebsiteRichard Kiser Official Web Page

Richard Kiser (born February 23, 1947), is an American CCM guitar player. Kiser has received over seventy industry awards and was voted the 2009 Instrumentalist of the Decade.

Biography[edit]

Kiser taught himself to play the guitar when he was thirteen and joined a gospel group three years later. He began playing professionally and touring in the late 1960s, but stopped about five years later to raise his family, working occasionally as a session musician and playing at his local church. In the 1990s he resumed touring, this time as a solo concert guitarist.[1] He has recorded eight acoustic albums and has two instructional videos.[2][3]

Kiser is a featured guest artist each year at the Chet Atkins Appreciation Society which holds its annual convention in Nashville, Tennessee. Kiser has shared the stage with performers such as Roy Clark, Charlie McCoy, Boots Randolph, David L Cook, Terri Gibbs, Phil Driscoll, The Oak Ridge Boys and Barbara Fairchild.[4]

Music[edit]

Kiser's finger picking style has been defined as being closely related to that of guitar legend, Chet Atkins. Kiser attributes his style to Atkins and designs shows with fellow musicians that showcase the same. Kiser finds himself mostly in religious venues, but has stepped out of those venues to perform with fellow artists such as Country Music Hall of Fame member Charlie McCoy and Jason Coleman who is the grandson of the late Floyd Cramer.[5] In 2013 Kiser received an Emmy Award nomination for his work on the soundtrack for the "Hands of Hope" project. A song that was written by David Meece, David L Cook and Bruce Carroll which brought attention to domestic violence upon women and children.[6]

Business[edit]

In 2011 Kiser formed a non-profit company called "Richard Kiser Music Ministries" which handles all of his religious based music affairs.[7] In 2011 Kiser became the president of the Artists Music Guild whose main function is to educate and protect artists against predatory industry practices. They also teach in the public school systems and help with dwindling curriculum inside of the arts classrooms. Kiser retired as the board president due to health issues but remains on the board as an advisor.[8]

Awards[edit]

Kiser has won more than 70 major awards, including being inducted into the CGMA Hall of Fame in 2009.[9] He was named Instrumentalist of the Decade by the International Country Gospel Music Association and three-time Artist of the Year the Country Gospel Music Association.[1][10] He won a Telly Award for his participation in the video production of "Let's Do This Together."[11]

Private life[edit]

Kiser lives in Salem, Virginia with his wife of over fifty years Esther. They have three sons and multiple grandchildren.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Kiser, Richard. "Kiser Bio". Richard Kiser. Retrieved 20 December 2016. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  2. ^ Kiser, Richard. "Richard Kiser Instructional Videos". TrueFire.com. Retrieved 20 December 2016. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  3. ^ Kiser, Richard. "Kiser Discography Listing". MTV.com. Retrieved 20 December 2016. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  4. ^ "Chet Atkins Appreciation Society". Chet Atkins Society. Retrieved 20 December 2016. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)[failed verification]
  5. ^ Kiser, Richard. "Kiser On Tour With McCoy and Coleman". ITunes. Retrieved 21 December 2016. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  6. ^ "Kiser Garners Emmy Nomination for Participation in Hands of Hope". Richard Kiser. Retrieved 21 December 2016. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  7. ^ Kiser, Richard. "Kiser Incorporates Richard Kiser Music Ministries in 2011". VA State Office of Corporations. Retrieved 21 December 2016. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  8. ^ Guild, Artists Music. "Kiser Retires as Guild President". Artists Music Guild. Artists Music Guild. Retrieved 21 December 2016. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  9. ^ CGMA. "Kiser Inducted Into the CGMA Hall of Fame". CGMA. Retrieved 20 December 2016. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  10. ^ "Artists of the Decade". County Gospel Music Association. Retrieved 20 December 2016. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  11. ^ "Kiser Wins Telly Award for Lets Do This Together". Richard Kiser. Retrieved 21 December 2016. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)

External links[edit]