Rick Ferraro

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Rick Ferraro
Ontario MPP
In office
1987–1990
Preceded by New riding
Succeeded by Derek Fletcher
Constituency Guelph
In office
1985–1987
Preceded by Harry Worton
Succeeded by Riding abolished
Constituency Wellington South
Personal details
Born (1950-01-07) January 7, 1950 (age 67)
Guelph, Ontario
Political party Liberal
Occupation Business owner

Enrico Eugenio "Rick" Ferraro (born January 7, 1950) is a former politician in Ontario, Canada. He was a Liberal member of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario from 1985 to 1990.

Background[edit]

Ferraro was educated at the University of Guelph, and was a founder of Kids Can Play - Guelph. Ferraro is an active member of the Guelph community. He is a partner in Steele Ferraro Insurance Brokerage, he also owns the Grange and Victoria Plaza.

Politics[edit]

He was elected to the Ontario legislature in the 1985 provincial election, defeating Progressive Conservative Marilyn Robinson by 5,006 votes in the constituency of Wellington South.[1][2] He was re-elected by more than 9,000 votes over NDP candidate Derek Fletcher in the 1987 election, in the redistributed riding of Guelph.[1][3]

Ferraro was a backbench supporter of David Peterson's government, and held several parliamentary assistant positions. In 1986, he was appointed as Ontario's first Small Business Advocate.

The Liberals were defeated by the NDP in the 1990 provincial election, and Ferraro lost his seat to Fletcher by 3,097 votes.[1][4] He attempted a comeback in the 1995 election, but lost to Brenda Elliott of the Progressive Conservatives by just over 5,700 votes.[1][5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Guelph (027)". CBC. Retrieved 14 January 2011. 
  2. ^ "Results of vote in Ontario election". The Globe and Mail. May 3, 1985. p. 13. 
  3. ^ "Results from individual ridings". The Windsor Star. September 11, 1987. p. F2. 
  4. ^ "Ontario election: Riding-by-riding voting results". The Globe and Mail. September 7, 1990. p. A12. 
  5. ^ "Summary of Valid Ballots by Candidate". Elections Ontario. June 8, 1995. 

External links[edit]