Rig-a-Jig-Jig

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Rig-a-Jig-Jig is a popular nineteenth-century silly song where a young man encounters a pretty girl.[1] It is useful for singing games since it is a familiar tune that can be used by activity leaders even if there are no available musicians.[2]

Uses[edit]

The song can be used for various activities. It is used for single-circle games.[3] It can also be used to encourage kids to choose a partner in children's games.[4] In this set-up the players are arranged in a circle. A "young man" then moves inside the circle while singing the song. One the "a pretty girl I chanced to meet" line he bows to one of the members of the circle (which can be termed as "pretty ladies"). If the pretty lady sings "a nice young man" then they join hands in the chorus and move together. The process is repeated with a new young man until all players are partnered.[5]

Lyrics[edit]

I. As I was walking down the street Heigh ho, Heigh ho, Heigh ho, Heigh ho,

II. a pretty girl (or a nice young man) I chanced to meet Heigh ho, Heigh ho, Heigh ho, Heigh ho

III. Rig a jig jig and away we go, away we go, away we go. Rig a jig jig and away we go, Heigh ho, Heigh ho, Heigh ho, Heigh ho[5]


References[edit]

  1. ^ Howle, Mary Jeanette (March 1997). "Play-Party Games in the Modern Classroom". Music Educators Journal. 83 (5): 24. doi:10.2307/3399004. 
  2. ^ Gardner, Ella (2002). Handbook for Recreation Leaders. The Minerva Group, Inc. p. 1. ISBN 9781589637757. Retrieved March 4, 2017. 
  3. ^ United States. Children's Bureau (1936). Publication. U.S. Government Printing Office. p. 3. Retrieved March 4, 2017. 
  4. ^ Humpal, M. (September 1, 1991). "The Effects of an Integrated Early Childhood Music Program on Social Interaction Among Children with Handicaps and Their Typical Peers". Journal of Music Therapy. 28 (3): 161–177. doi:10.1093/jmt/28.3.161. 
  5. ^ a b Farwell, Jane (1953). "EC2012 Recreation for Rural Youth". Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension: 13. Retrieved March 4, 2017.