Robert M. Weitman

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Robert M. Weitman (1905–1989) was an American film, TV and theatre producer and studio executive. For a number of years he was a leading executive at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, being head of production during a successful period in the 1960s under president Robert O'Brien. The two men oversaw the production of the last consistent run of classic films at the studio.[1][2]

Weitman ran theatres for Paramount in the 1930s and 40s, often booking big bands, In 1953 he went to work for ABC then moved to CBD in 1956. He joined MGM in 1960 and worked in TV production, enjoying success with the Dr Kildare series. He was appointed head of film production in January 1962.[3] He oversaw the completion and release of How the West Was Won and Mutiny on the Bounty and the first film of his regime was Unsinkable Molly Brown. Among the films initiated under his management were Young Cassidy, 36 Hours, The Dirty Dozen and Dr Zhivago.[4] MGM also expanded its TV production division.[5] Under Weitman and O'Brien, MGM, which made a $30 million loss in 1963, turned around and made a profit of $17 million the following year.[6] In 1966 they reported a $10 million profit.[7]

MGM became the subject of a corporate take over attempt by Philip Levin in 1967.[8] Weitman resigned in 1967 and was replaced by Clark Ramsay.[9] Weitman became head of production at Columbia, replacing Mike Frankovich.[10] Although he had a five-year contract Weitman left this post in late 1969, Columbia saying the new filmmaking environment meant his job would no longer exist.[11] Weitman then became an independent producer with an exclusive contract to Columbia, starting with The Anderson Tapes.[12]

Filmography[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ 'Obituaries – Robert M. Weitman, 83, Former Producer' New York Times, 22 January 1989 accessed May 22, 2012
  2. ^ Robert Weitman, 84; Innovator in Era of Big Bands Los Angeles Times (1923-Current File) [Los Angeles, Calif] 23 Jan 1989: A16.
  3. ^ MGM Appoints Robert Weitman to Studio Post Los Angeles Times (1923-Current File) [Los Angeles, Calif] 08 Jan 1962: 30.
  4. ^ 26 Story Properties on MGM's Schedule Los Angeles Times (1923-Current File) [Los Angeles, Calif] 12 Nov 1963: D8.
  5. ^ MGM Readies 8 Series for Next Season Los Angeles Times (1923-Current File) [Los Angeles, Calif] 23 July 1964: C11.
  6. ^ MGM Lion Purrs About the Future Champlin, Charles. Los Angeles Times (1923-Current File) [Los Angeles, Calif] 11 Nov 1965: d12.
  7. ^ It's Showdown Week in Fight to Control MGM: MGM Stockholders Get Big Pitch Goldman, John J; SEDERBERG, ARELO. Los Angeles Times (1923-Current File) [Los Angeles, Calif] 19 Feb 1967: e1.
  8. ^ MGM Management's Slate for Directors Holds 5.5% of Stock: Total, Listed in Proxy Statement, Compares With 13.5% of Firm's Shares for Dissident Group Wall Street Journal (1923 - Current file) [New York, N.Y] 09 Jan 1967: 10.
  9. ^ MGMs Top Executives Meet Here Los Angeles Times (1923-Current File) [Los Angeles, Calif] 11 July 1967: c7.
  10. ^ Management Changes at the Dream Factory Champlin, Charles. Los Angeles Times (1923-Current File) [Los Angeles, Calif] 06 Aug 1967: c14.
  11. ^ Weitman to Leave His Columbia Post Warga, Wayne. Los Angeles Times (1923-Current File) [Los Angeles, Calif] 15 Oct 1969: f14.
  12. ^ Rights to 'Tapes' Acquired Martin, Betty. Los Angeles Times (1923-Current File) [Los Angeles, Calif] 05 Nov 1969: f12.

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