Robin Ward (television personality)

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Robin Ward
Born (1944-04-10) April 10, 1944 (age 74)
NationalityCanadian
OccupationActor/Television personality
Years active1969 – present

Robin Ward (born April 10, 1944) is a Canadian actor and television personality. He is known for hosting a 1980 revival of the American game show To Tell the Truth and later hosting a Canadian game show called Guess What. He was also an actor on the soap opera The Guiding Light, in addition to having starred in the Canadian-produced 1973-74 science fiction series The Starlost and served as narrator of the late-1980s revival of The Twilight Zone for a season replacing Charles Aidman. His film career included roles in many Canadian movies, such as Explosion (1969), Frankenstein on Campus (1970, as Victor Frankenstein), The Girl in Blue (1973) and Thrillkill (1984).

Ward got his start in entertainment as a member of the Toronto based folk-pop ensemble "The Allen-Ward Trio" during the mid 1960s. The Trio was often affiliated with Toronto's influential Yorkville/Rochdale hippie community, and were peers of Joni Mitchell and Neil Young during their early careers.[1]

During the 1980s and 1990s, Ward worked for CFTO-TV in Toronto, Ontario, as a weatherman, and as an entertainment reporter. He was also an on-location reporter for Good Morning Toronto, a morning program on The Weather Network's Toronto-area feed. He has played in a number of guest and supporting roles in television and some motion pictures.

In 2010 he narrated the well received documentary series Greatest Tank Battles.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Jesse Kinos-Goodin; Colton Eddy (April 5, 2018). "Neil Young's Canada". cbc.ca. Retrieved January 9, 2019. In the biography, Shakey, he recalls it was at his friend and folk artist David Rea's apartment,"with some members of the Allen Ward Trio — Craig Allen, Robin Ward.... It was fun. A revelation."

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Joe Garagiola
Host of To Tell the Truth
1980–1981
Succeeded by
Gordon Elliott in 1990