Rosh Pinah mine

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Rosh Pinah mine
Location
ǁKaras Region
Country Namibia
Production
Products Lead, Zinc

The Rosh Pinah mine is one of the largest and most important lead and zinc mines in Namibia.[1] The mine is located in the extreme southwest, about 15 kilometers north of the Orange River and 50 kilometers east of the ocean in Rosh Pinah in the ǁKaras Region of southern Namibia.[1] The mine has reserves amounting to 14 million tonnes of ore grading 2% lead and 8% zinc thus resulting 280,000 tonnes of lead and 1.12 million tonnes of zinc.[1]

History[edit]

The Rosh Pinah mine owes its existence to the German-born Jew Mose Kohan. The name "Rosh Pinah" is a Hebrew term for "cornerstone" and is a biblical reference. Kohan discovered zinc in the Hunz Mountains in 1963.[2]

Rapid development of the mine took place after independence. Water was pumped 28 kilometers from the Orange River, a power station was built, and a heavily automated plant now produces up to 200 tons of zinc concentrate a day.[3]

Glencore mining company acquired a controlling ownership of Rosh Pinah from the South African-based miner Exxaro and Jaguar in late 2011.[4] Glencore has subsequently increased its stake to 80.08%, the remainder of the shares 19.92% being owned by the Black Economic Empowerment (BEE).[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Mining in Namibia" (PDF). gsn.gov.na. 2012. Retrieved 2013-06-25. 
  2. ^ Tonchi, Victor L., William A. Lindeke, and John J. Grotpeter, "Rosh Pihan Mine" Historical Dictionary of Namibia. 2nd edition. (2012) Toronto: The Scarecrow Press, Inc, p. 373.
  3. ^ Tonchi, Victor L., William A. Lindeke, and John J. Grotpeter, "Rosh Pinah Mine" Historical Dictionary of Namibia. 2nd edition. (2012) Toronto: The Scarecrow Press, Inc, p. 373.
  4. ^ Tonchi, Victor L., William A. Lindeke, and John J. Grotpeter, "Rosh Pinah Mine" Historical Dictionary of Namibia. 2nd edition. (2012) Toronto: The Scarecrow Press, Inc, p. 374.
  5. ^ "Glencore Acquires Rosh Pinah. New Era". Retrieved 2013-07-28.