Royal Waterloo Hospital for Children and Women

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Royal Waterloo Hospital for Children and Women
Former Royal Waterloo Hospital, Waterloo Road (geograph 4781041).jpg
Royal Waterloo Hospital for Children and Women
Royal Waterloo Hospital for Children and Women is located in London Borough of Lambeth
Royal Waterloo Hospital for Children and Women
Location within Lambeth
Geography
Location Waterloo Road, London, England
Coordinates 51°30′19″N 0°06′48″W / 51.5052°N 0.1132°W / 51.5052; -0.1132Coordinates: 51°30′19″N 0°06′48″W / 51.5052°N 0.1132°W / 51.5052; -0.1132
Organisation
Care system Joined NHS in 1948
Affiliated university Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust
Services
Emergency department No
Beds c.200 in 1903
History
Founded 1816 as Universal Dispensary for Children
Closed 27 July 1976
Links
Lists Hospitals in England

The Royal Waterloo Hospital for Children and Women was a hospital located on the corner of Waterloo Bridge Road and Stamford Street near Waterloo station in London, England.[1] Closed in 1981 it is now a dormitory building for the London branch of the University of Notre Dame.

History[edit]

The hospital was founded by Dr John Bunnell Davis in 1816 as the Universal Dispensary for Children.[2][3] In this first incarnation the hospital was located at St Andrew's Hill, in the now demolished Doctors' Commons in the City of London.[4] The name of the hospital was changed to the Royal Universal Dispensary for Children in 1821 and, after a foundation stone was laid by the Duke of York for new premises near Waterloo Bridge in 1823, it moved into the new premises in 1824.[3]

It became the Royal Universal Infirmary for Children in 1824, the Royal Infirmary for Children in 1843 and the Royal Infirmary for Children and Women in 1852.[5] In an 1856 review of the hospital system in London, the British Journal of Homeopathy noted the serious shortage of hospital beds for children in London:

Again, London possesses but one hospital (Hospital for Sick Children, Great Ormond Street), where sick children are received, containing the insignificant number of 30 beds. Paris has a large hospital (Enfants Malades), containing 600 beds for sick children. The Royal Infirmary for Children, Waterloo Bridge Road, is said to be capable, with a few alterations, of containing 80 beds; but we have no reason to suppose that it does yet contain any; and as its funds are stated to be very limited, there seems small hopes of its taking in sick children for the present.[6]

The hospital underwent a further name change to the Royal Hospital for Children and Women in 1875.[4] Between 1903 and 1904 premises were built at a cost of £45,000 to house an outpatients' department and inpatient accommodation of 90 beds at the corner of Waterloo Bridge Road and Stamford Street near Waterloo station.[1] By the year of the hospital's rebuilding in 1903 the concerns over bed space remained: an article in the British Medical Journal raised the concern that the Waterloo site left little room for extension.[7] It became the Royal Waterloo Hospital for Children and Women at that time.[3]

The hospital joined the National Health Service in 1948 as part of the nearby St Thomas' Hospital group of hospitals (now Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust). The Royal Waterloo Hospital closed on 27 July 1976.[4] The building was awarded Grade II listed status by English Heritage in 1980.[5] In 1981 it was sold and for the next three decades was the central London campus of Schiller International University. In 2011, Schiller International University moved out of the building and sold it to University of Notre Dame of South Bend, Indiana, USA where it was renovated and converted into dormitories.[8]

Notable staff[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Seventy-Eighth Annual Meeting Of The British Medical Association London, July, 1910". The British Medical Journal. 1 (2568): 703–706. 1910. JSTOR 25289985.
  2. ^ Franklin, Alfred White (1963). "Smallpox Vaccination". The British Medical Journal. 1 (5345): 1609–1609. JSTOR 20381141.
  3. ^ a b c "Royal Waterloo Hospital for Children and Women". Lost Hospitals of London. Retrieved 7 July 2018.
  4. ^ a b c "Royal Waterloo Hospital". AIM25. Retrieved 12 March 2011.
  5. ^ a b Royal Waterloo Hospital, English Heritage, retrieved 13 March 2011
  6. ^ "'The Hospital System of London: 1856' in 'Knowsley Pamphlet Collection". British Journal of Homeopathy: 40. 1856. JSTOR 60101166.
  7. ^ a b c d e "The Royal Waterloo Hospital For Children And Women". The British Medical Journal. 2 (2235): 1167–1168. 1903. JSTOR 20278208.
  8. ^ "The World of Learning, Section Six: American Colleges in the UK". 1988. p. 139. Missing or empty |url= (help)

External links[edit]