Ruth Gavison

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Ruth Gavison

Ruth Gavison (Hebrew: רות גביזון‎; March 28, 1945, Jerusalem – August 15, 2020, Jerusalem)[1] was an Israeli expert of human rights, Professor of Law at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and recipient of the Israel Prize.

Biography[edit]

Ruth Gavison was born in Jerusalem on March 28, 1945 to a Sephardic Jewish family. Her father's ancestors were Moroccan Jews who immigrated from Tetouan to Jerusalem in the 19th century. Her mother's side was Greek Jewish.[2] She grew up in Haifa. She graduated from Hebrew University law school in 1969. In 1970, she was also awarded a B.A. in Philosophy and Economics.

Further academic degrees and qualifications:

  • LL.M., 1971, Hebrew University, Jerusalem.
  • D.Phil. (Oxon.) (legal philosophy), 1975, University of Oxford.
  • Clerk to Justice B. Halevi, Israel Supreme Court 1970.
  • Admitted to the Israeli Bar 1971.

Academic career[edit]

Her areas of research included Ethnic Conflict, the Protection of Minorities, Human Rights, Political Theory, Judiciary Law, Religion and Politics, and Israel as a Jewish and democratic state. She was a member of the Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities.[3]

Judicial career[edit]

Gavison was nominated for a position on Israel's Supreme Court in 2005 but failed to secure a majority for the appointment.[4] Justice Minister Daniel Friedmann reportedly asserted in 2007 that existing Supreme Court justices opposed her nomination because of their disagreement with her views.[5]

Published works[edit]

She published an essay on privacy in the Yale Law Journal, and edited a volume dedicated to H.L.A. Hart's legal philosophy published by Oxford. Recently, she published an essay about days of rest in divided societies (co-authored with Nahshon Perez), included in 'Law and Religion in Comparative Context', published by Cambridge. She was a member of the Editorial Board of the Jewish Review of Books.

With Rabbi Yaaqov Medan, she coauthored the Gavison-Medan Covenant, a proposal for the coexistence of religious and secular Israelis.[6]

Civil rights activism[edit]

Gavison was a founding member of the Association for Civil Rights in Israel (ACRI), where she served for many years as Chairperson and as President from 1996 to 1999. Professor Gavison was a member of the International Commission of Jurists 1998-2008. In 2005 she founded Metzilah (Center of Zionist, Jewish, Liberal, and Humanistic Thought) and served as its chair and founding president.

Academic appointments[edit]

  • 1969-2020: various appointments at the Faculty of Law of the Hebrew University, Jerusalem (HUJI).
  • 1978-1980: Visiting Associate Professor of Law, Yale Law School.
  • 1984-2010: Haim H. Cohn Chair for Human Rights, HUJI.
  • 1990-2010: Full Professor, Faculty of Law, HUJI.
  • 1990-1992: Visiting Professor of Law, University of Southern California.
  • 1998-1999: Fellow, Center for Human Values, Princeton University.
  • 2010-2020: Professor Emerita, HUJI.
  • 2011-2012: Fellow, Strauss center for Law and Justice, NYU Law School.

Public committees[edit]

Gavison was a member of numerous Israeli Public Inquiry committees, including the following:

  • 1976: Member, Kahan Committee on Privacy (generated Israel's law of privacy 1981).
  • 1983: Member, committee on the privacy of information in governmental data-banks (generated an amendment to the privacy law).
  • 1987-1990: Member, a public committee on orthodox-secular relationships in Israel.
  • 1994-1997: Member, National Committee for Scientific and Technological Infrastructure.
  • 1996-1997: Member, Zadok committee on press laws.
  • 1997-1998: Member, Shamgar Committee on the Appointment of the Attorney-General and Related Issues.
  • 2006-2008: Member, Winograd Commission to investigate the 2006 Lebanon War.
  • 2013-2015: commissioned by the minister of Justice to report on the constitutional anchoring of Israel as a Jewish and democratic state.

Awards and recognition[edit]

  • In 1997, Gavison was awarded the Zeltner Prize for legal research.[7]
  • In 1998, she received the Bar Association Prize, together with Association for Civil Rights in Israel.[7]
  • In 2001, she received the Avi Chai Prize, together with Rabbi Yaakov Medan, for bringing together Israeli society.[7]
  • In 2002, she was awarded the Jerusalem Prize for tolerance.[7]
  • In 2003, she was awarded the EMET Prize.[7]
  • In 2003, she was granted an honorary doctorate by the Jewish Theological Seminary, New York.[7]
  • In 2009, she was awarded the Cheshin Prize for excellence in research by the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.[7]
  • In 2009, she was granted an honorary doctorate by the Bar-Ilan University.[7]
  • In 2011, she was awarded the Israel Prize, for legal research.[8][9]
  • In 2013, she received the Solomon Bublick Award of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.
  • In 2015, she was awarded an honorary degree by the Open University in Israel.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "המשפטנית כלת פרס ישראל פרופ' רות גביזון הלכה לעולמה בגיל 75". 13news.co.il (in Hebrew). Retrieved 15 August 2020.
  2. ^ https://www.haaretz.co.il/news/education/.premium-1.9074767
  3. ^ Siegel-Itzkovitch, Judy (10 December 2015). "Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities admits nine new members – including three women". Jerusalem Post. Retrieved 15 December 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  4. ^ Zeev Segal, "Choose the best judge for the job", HaAretz 23 September 2008
  5. ^ Gil Hoffman, "Olmert Scheming Against Winograd"[permanent dead link], Jerusalem Post, 9 February 2007
  6. ^ "'Through secular-religious dialogue, all problems can be solved'". Israel National News. 3 February 2019. Retrieved 9 June 2019. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h Resume of Ruth Gavison (in Hebrew) Israel Prize website
  8. ^ "Law professor Gavison wins Israel Prize for legal research" - The Jerusalem Post, March 21, 2011
  9. ^ Judges Rationale for grant of Israel Prize (in Hebrew), Israel Prize website

External links[edit]