Sachs MadAss

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Sachs Madass 125 yellow.jpg
Manufacturer Sachs
Production 2004 - present
Class Underbone
Engine 49 cc or 124 cc
Top speed 125: approx 90 km/h (56 mph). 50: 32 mph (51 km/h)[1]
Power 6,4KW(11hp)/7500rpm (125cc)[citation needed]
Torque 8,0Nm(6lb-ft)/5000rpm (125cc)[citation needed]
Transmission Automatic (centrifugal clutch) or 4-speed manual on either 50cc or 125cc
Suspension Telescopic Fork (Front), Directly linked shock strut With monoshock (Rear)
Brakes Single disc (260 Front, 215 Rear)
Tires 90/90-16 (Front), 120/80-16 (Rear)(2004-2006)/90/80-16 (Front), 120/70-16 (Rear)(2007-present)
Wheelbase 1,235 mm
Dimensions L: 1,840 mm
W: 760 mm
H: 1,035 mm
Seat height 855 mm
Weight 95 kg (dry)
100 kg (wet)
Fuel capacity 1.2 US gal or 4.5 l or 1.00 imp gal (50 cc)
1.32 US gal or 5.0 l or 1.10 imp gal (125 cc)
Oil capacity 0.9 litres (0.95 US qt)

The Sachs MadAss is an underbone motorcycle available in a 49 cc (3.0 cu in) or 125 cc (7.6 cu in) made in China and Taiwan and distributed by German automotive company Sachs Motorcycles since 2004. The engine is based on the popular horizontal one cylinder originally used in Honda mopeds and small motorcycles from the late 1960s.

It incorporates the fuel tank into the frame and has no external bodywork or fairings. It has a stainless steel under-seat exhaust, a four-speed manual gearbox or automatic transmission and dual hydraulic disc brake. The front headlights are positioned vertically. In the US, the 49 cc model is limited to 40 mph (64 km/h) to qualify as a moped in some jurisdictions.

The MadAss has been sold in the US as the Xkeleton Trickster, and under the Pierspeed and Tomberlin brands as the MadAss. In Canada, it was also sold as the AMG Nitro.

As of December 2014, the Madass 50 is once again available in the US in 49cc form, via a new distributor, Excalibur Motorsports of Chino, California. It is CARB certified for sale and use in the state of California.


  1. ^ *2010 Sachs MadAss Review, Steve Guzman, 26 November 2009,