Cherriots

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Salem-Keizer Transit)
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Cherriots
Cherriots logo.svg
Cherriots 1402 at Courthouse Square, Salem.jpg
A Cherriots bus at Salem's Courthouse Square Transit Mall
Founded November 6, 1979
Headquarters 555 Court Street NE
Salem, Oregon, US
Service area Salem and Keizer, Oregon
Service type Bus service, paratransit
Routes 30
Fleet 64 (Cherriots)
15 (Regional Contracted)
46 (CherryLift Bus)
Fuel type Diesel, CNG (Natural Gas), Gasoline
General manager Allan Pollock
Website cherriots.org

Cherriots, officially the Salem Area Mass Transit District, is a public transit operator based in Salem, Oregon, United States. The agency, whose name refers to the city's nickname (The Cherry City), provides bus and paratransit service in Salem and neighboring Keizer. It was founded in 1979 as the Salem Area Mass Transit District, replacing municipal and private systems, and renamed itself to Salem-Keizer Transit in 2003.

In 2016, the transit agency started a rebranding campaign to highlight its Cherriots operating name. All of its services now bear the Cherriots name. For example, a regional bus service previously called CARTS is now Cherriots Regional.[1]

History[edit]

Predecessors and formation[edit]

Bus service in Salem was previously operated by the private City Transit Lines, which was granted a franchise by the municipal government. The company folded in August 1958 and declared bankruptcy in January 1959. It was replaced on February 2 by Capital Transit, an independent operator founded by former City Transit drivers and mechanics.[2][3] In its six years of operation, Capital Transit faced declining revenue and ridership that forced it to consider bankruptcy.[4] On May 24, 1966, voters in Salem approved a property tax levy to purchase the Capital Transit system and operate it under the municipal government.[5] The City of Salem took over the bus system on July 1.[6] Under the new financing plan, which included increased fares, the bus system's operating expenses were stabilized and became eligible for federal subsidies to purchase a new fleet.[7] The name "Cherriots" was chosen for the bus system in September after a citywide contest, referencing the city's unofficial nickname, "The Cherry City";[8] the winning entry was submitted by A. Kenneth Yost, a faculty member at the Oregon College of Education and one of the contest's judges before his resignation.[9] The first new buses baring the Cherriots name, colored white with red "cherry" trimming, arrived in Salem by late November and were put into service in January 1967.[10][11] Cherriots buses also served Keizer and Four Corners until service was suspended by the Salem City Council in July 1976;[12] by October, the two areas established voter-approved contracts for a private operator to run bus services that connected to the Cherriots network.[13][14]

A 1968 report to the Salem government, prepared by the Mid Willamette Valley Council of Governments and funded by a federal grant, recommended that the Cherriots network be expanded to Keizer and Four Corners as part of a regional system.[15] The formation of a mass transit district to serve a larger system, funded using payroll taxes, was approved by the state legislature in 1969 and implemented in Portland and Eugene.[16][17] While Salem and Marion County urged the creation of a transit district, Polk County's board of commissioners expressed concern over the size of the taxing area.[18] The formation of a mass transit district was put on the January 13, 1976, election, with a second election scheduled in March to determine the type of tax used to finance the system.[19] Voters rejected the ballot measure by a three-to-one margin during a low-turnout election that included rural areas outside the proposed service and taxing area.[20][21] A second attempt on November 8, 1977, using the same proposed payroll tax and two-phase election,[22] was also rejected by voters.[23] The existing Cherriots system was saved from proposed cuts after the approval of a two-year levy by Salem residents in May 1978.[24][25]

A third attempt at the formation of a mass transit district was put on the November 6, 1979, ballot, during the peak of the oil crisis, and limited to within the Salem urban growth boundary.[16] The Salem Area Transit District and its five-member board was approved by a three-to-one margin, with wide support across the voting area.[26] The transit district's $2.35 million financing plan, using a local property tax, was rejected in May 1980 by a margin of 64 votes.[27] The city-run Cherriots system was renewed by a one-year levy, funded by a smaller property tax within Salem, that was approved by voters in June.[28] A trio of tax levies were put on the February 17, 1981, ballot: one to fund the operation of a consolidated bus system for one year, another for night bus service, and a final levy for fleet replacements and the construction of bus shelters.[29] The operations levy was passed by voters, while the remaining pair were rejected.[30] The Salem Area Transit District began funding bus service within Salem on July 1, 1981, under a contract with the municipal government's Cherriots system,[31] and expanded to outlying suburbs on September 1.[32]

Operational history[edit]

The approval of a $2.23 million tax levy in June 1982 allowed the Salem Area Transit District to take over operations of the Cherriots system on July 1, 1982.[33][34] The system was funded by one- and two-year levies passed by voters in 1983 and 1985, until the approval of a permanent tax base on May 20, 1986.[8][35] The five-member transit board was expanded to seven seats, all elected at-large, effective July 1, 1987.[36] The current headquarters and operating base for Cherriots, located on Del Webb Avenue in Salem, was dedicated in April 1989 by Senator Mark Hatfield and Governor Neil Goldschmidt.[8][37]

The statewide passage of Measure 5 limited property tax revenue used to fund bus services and was paired with declining matching revenues from the state. Cherriots maintained its level of service by using capital reserve funds to fund daily operations, while planning for potential cuts to service.[8][38] The state legislature passed a two-year rollback of the state's cap on matching funds from the transit payroll tax in 1993, allowing Cherriots to avoid service cuts while presenting a funding plan to voters.[8][39] Two attempts at establishing a larger funding base for Cherriots service were rejected by voters in 1993 and 1994, leading to the discontinuation of free services and increased fares.[8] On May 21, 1996, voters in the transit district approved an increased property tax base to fund expanded Cherriots service,[40] but statewide property tax caps forced the planned expansion to be rolled back.[8] On October 2, 2000, the R. G. Andersen-Wyckoff Transit Mall at Courthouse Square in downtown Salem opened, replacing earlier downtown transit centers and consolidating several Cherriots offices into one complex.[8][41] In 2003, the agency changed its name to Salem-Keizer Transit to include the city of Keizer; "Cherriots" was retained as a brand name.[42][43]

Salem-Keizer Transit, along with the City of Salem and consultants Nelson\Nygaard, began studying the feasibility of a modern streetcar system for downtown Salem in 2003.[44][45] The feasibility study, published in 2005, found that a three-to-four-mile (4.8 to 6.4 km) streetcar line would cost up to $61 million to construct.[46][47] The proposal was ultimately abandoned due to its cost and lack of funding options.[42][48]

Budget and service cuts[edit]

In 2009, Cherriots routes underwent major changes due to funding limitations. Service hours were reduced and Saturday service was eliminated. The removal of Saturday service left much of the population without weekend transport; it is a serious problem for many citizens. At the same time, Cherriots redesigned many of its routes to provide better service within funding levels.

In 2015, Cherriots started a "Moving Forward" plan which made new routes, including consolidations to achieve frequent service.

The passage of Oregon House Bill 2017, which provides state funds for transit districts across Oregon, could restore services lost to budget cuts in 2008 and 2009. [49]HB 2017 could bring $5 million to $6 million per year to support transit in the Salem-Keizer area, as well as some regional services to smaller cities in Marion and Polk counties. In August 2017, Oregon Gov. Kate Brown signed HB 2017.[50] But because of state administrative requirements for dispersing HB 2017 funds, Cherriots is unlikely to receive any additional state money until January 2019. Proposed service improvements, such as restoring Saturday bus service and adding bus routes that operate later in the evening, as well on Sunday are expected to occur in 2019. A new Downtown Circulator will also be launched with the new funding.

Services[edit]

Cherriots operates 21 local bus routes in Salem and Keizer, as well as six routes under the Cherriots Regional brand serving outlying areas in Marion and Polk counties. Buses only run on weekdays until 9 p.m., with no service in the late evening, on weekends, or during major holidays.[51] The system's main hub is the Downtown Transit Center at Courthouse Square in Salem, located a few blocks from the Oregon State Capitol building. The facility was first opened in 2000 and remodeled in 2014.[52] The transit center is also served by inter-county express service to Wilsonville, operated jointly by Cherriots and SMART.[53]

The agency also operates regional bus services under the Cherriots Regional brand, serving Woodburn, Dallas, Stayton, and Gates.[54] Paratransit service is run as Cherriots LIFT and covers areas within 34 mile (1.2 km) of a fixed Cherriots route.[55][56] Adult bus fares on regular Cherriots routes are set at $1.60 for one-way trips and $3.25 for day passes.[51] In 2017, Cherriots and its regional services carried a combined total of 3.1 million passengers.[51]

Fleet[edit]

Cherriots maintains a fleet of 64 buses for its regular services, alongside 46 LIFT vehicles and 15 Regional buses.[57] Regular Cherriots routes use buses that are 35 to 40 feet (11 to 12 m) in length and are powered by compressed natural gas or biodiesel; the largest buses have a maximum capacity of 38 seated and 20 standing passengers.[51] Cherriots Regional buses range from gasoline-powered minibuses to standard diesel buses.[51]

Cherriots[edit]

As of April 2017[58]
Year Manufacturer Model Fleet
Numbers
Qty. Length Fuel Type
2002 Orion Orion VII 101–112 12 35 ft (11 m) CNG
2002 Orion Orion VII 201–212 12 40 ft (12 m) CNG
2004 Orion Orion VII 213–214 2 40 ft (12 m) CNG
2005 Orion Orion VII 115–122 8 40 ft (12 m) CNG
2008 Gillig Low Floor 215–222 10 35 ft (11 m) Biodiesel
2008 Gillig Low Floor 223–226 4 40 ft (12 m) Biodiesel
2011 Gillig Low Floor 227–234 8 40 ft (12 m) Biodiesel
2011 Gillig Low Floor 123–126 4 35 ft (11 m) Biodiesel
2012 Gillig Low Floor 127–130 4 35 ft (11 m) Biodiesel

Cherriots Regional[edit]

As of April 2017[58]
Year Manufacturer Fleet
Numbers
Qty. Length Fuel Type
2003 Freightliner 351–352 2 33 ft (10 m) Diesel
2004 Freightliner 353–354 2 33 ft (10 m) Diesel
2006 Freightliner 355 1 33 ft (10 m) Diesel
2006 Freightliner 356–357 2 33 ft (10 m) Diesel
2009 Ford E-350 303–304 2 25 ft (7.6 m) Gasoline
2010 Ford E-350 305 1 25 ft (7.6 m) Gasoline
2010 Freightliner 358–359 2 33 ft (10 m) Diesel
2010 Freightliner 360 1 33 ft (10 m) Diesel
2012 Ford E-350 306–307 2 25 ft (7.6 m) Gasoline

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Public transit services in the Salem and Keizer, Oregon areas". www.cherriots.org. Retrieved 2017-08-29. 
  2. ^ Marshall, Tom (January 25, 1959). "Capital Transit Expected to Get Bus Franchise". The Oregon Statesman. p. 2. Retrieved January 7, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.  Free to read
  3. ^ "New Group Starts Bus Service Today; Salem Buses Slate More Frequent Runs". The Oregon Statesman. February 2, 1959. p. 1. Retrieved January 7, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.  Free to read
  4. ^ Morrison, Allen (January 2, 1966). "Bus Drivers Losing Valiant Battle". The Oregon Statesman. p. 35. Retrieved January 7, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.  Free to read
  5. ^ "Bus Budget Approved; Capital Plans Slashed". The Oregon Statesman. May 26, 1966. p. 5. Retrieved January 7, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.  Free to read
  6. ^ "Council Orders Engineering For Main Sewer Interceptor". The Oregon Statesman. July 13, 1966. p. 5. Retrieved January 7, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.  Free to read
  7. ^ "Salem's City Buses 'Now In the Black'". The Oregon Statesman. September 21, 1966. p. 1. Retrieved January 7, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.  Free to read
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h Hiscocks, Courlette (July 2000). "Salem Area Mass Transit District (1979-2001)". Salem Public Library. Retrieved January 8, 2018. 
  9. ^ Morrison, Allen (September 21, 1966). "Winning Name for Salem's City Buses Is 'Cherriots'". The Oregon Statesman. p. 1. Retrieved January 7, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.  Free to read
  10. ^ "New Buses, Transit Boss Report for Duty". The Oregon Statesman. November 29, 1966. p. 1. Retrieved January 7, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.  Free to read
  11. ^ Maki, Ellida (January 29, 1967). "'Cherriots' Begin Service in Salem". The Oregon Statesman. p. 1. Retrieved January 7, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.  Free to read
  12. ^ Sass, Jerry (June 20, 1976). "Riders voice their views about cutoff of service". The Oregon Statesman. p. 7B. Retrieved January 7, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.  Free to read
  13. ^ Dickie, Lance (October 3, 1976). "Improvements in Cherriots bus system begin Monday". The Oregon Statesman. p. 8B. Retrieved January 7, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.  Free to read
  14. ^ "Here's a history of city's service". The Oregon Statesman. November 4, 1979. p. 4B. Retrieved January 7, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.  Free to read
  15. ^ Morrison, Allen (December 22, 1968). "Suburban Bus Fare Boost Is Proposed". The Oregon Statesman. p. 2. Retrieved January 7, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.  Free to read
  16. ^ a b Dickie, Lance (October 28, 1979). "Backers feel time is right for transit district". The Oregon Statesman. p. 1F. Retrieved January 7, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.  Free to read
  17. ^ Blankenbaker, Ron (October 11, 1974). "Study Urges Transit District To Expand City Bus System". The Oregon Statesman. p. 2. Retrieved January 7, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.  Free to read
  18. ^ Arends Jr., Lewis H. (September 24, 1975). "Polk Worried About Salem Transit Tax". The Oregon Statesman. p. 8. Retrieved January 7, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.  Free to read
  19. ^ Blankenbaker, Ron (January 11, 1976). "Financing: Payroll Tax 'Most Likely' for Transit System". The Oregon Statesman. p. 8. Retrieved January 7, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.  Free to read
  20. ^ Blankenbaker, Ron (January 14, 1976). "Marion, Polk Trounce Transit District". The Oregon Statesman. p. 1. Retrieved January 7, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.  Free to read
  21. ^ Blankenbaker, Ron (January 30, 1976). "Transit Vote Brought Out Campaign Money From the 'Big 3'". The Oregon Statesman. p. 1. Retrieved January 7, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.  Free to read
  22. ^ Dickie, Lance (November 6, 1977). "Measure 52 seeks formation of transit district". The Oregon Statesman. p. 1D. Retrieved January 7, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.  Free to read
  23. ^ Dickie, Lance (November 10, 1977). "Vote leaves future of Salem bus service in air". The Oregon Statesman. p. 1. Retrieved January 7, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.  Free to read
  24. ^ Dickie, Lance (May 24, 1978). "Voters approve funds for Salem buses". The Oregon Statesman. p. 2A. Retrieved January 7, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.  Free to read
  25. ^ Hayes, John (April 20, 1978). "Salem bus service faces drastic cuts unless voters approve levy proposal". The Oregon Statesman. p. 1C. Retrieved January 7, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.  Free to read
  26. ^ Dickie, Lance (November 7, 1979). "Salem area transit district wins easily; 3 to 1 vote OKs formation of district". The Oregon Statesman. p. 1A. Retrieved January 7, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.  Free to read
  27. ^ Dickie, Lance (June 22, 1980). "Salem voters to decide whether to keep Cherriots rolling". The Oregon Statesman Journal. p. 2B. Retrieved January 7, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.  Free to read
  28. ^ "Buses get the needed 'gas'". The Oregon Statesman Journal. June 25, 1980. p. 3A. Retrieved January 7, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.  Free to read
  29. ^ "Two cities put money measure on ballot". Statesman Journal. January 14, 1981. p. 6C. Retrieved January 7, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.  Free to read
  30. ^ Postrel, Dan (February 18, 1981). "Main transit levy is approved; Two supplemental proposals fail as 20 pct. cast ballots". Statesman Journal. p. 1A. Retrieved January 7, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.  Free to read
  31. ^ "Transit district misses deadline on fare cut". Statesman Journal. July 1, 1981. p. 1B. Retrieved January 7, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.  Free to read
  32. ^ "Bus changes bring confusion". Statesman Journal. September 1, 1981. p. 1B. Retrieved January 7, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.  Free to read
  33. ^ Postrel, Dan (June 23, 1982). "Bus transfer travels unsure road". Statesman Journal. p. 1B. Retrieved January 8, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.  Free to read
  34. ^ Postrel, Dan (July 1, 1982). "City negotiates end to dispute over transfer". Statesman Journal. p. 1B. Retrieved January 8, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.  Free to read
  35. ^ "Transit district gets green light". Statesman Journal. May 21, 1986. p. 7A. Retrieved January 8, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.  Free to read
  36. ^ Novak, Theresa (March 15, 1987). "16 run for bus board". Statesman Journal. p. 1C. Retrieved January 8, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.  Free to read
  37. ^ "Salem Area Mass Transit District Request for Proposal for Landscape Architect and Engineering Services" (PDF). Salem Area Mass Transit District. July 2, 2015. pp. 1–2. Retrieved January 8, 2018. 
  38. ^ Athon, Anastasia (May 27, 1992). "Dip into savings would keep buses on track". Statesman Journal. p. 4C. Retrieved January 8, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.  Free to read
  39. ^ "Bill to aid Salem buses awaits governor's action". Statesman Journal. September 9, 1993. p. 2A. Retrieved January 8, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.  Free to read
  40. ^ Henrikson, John (May 22, 1996). "Cherriots wins support". Statesman Journal. p. 1B. Retrieved January 8, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.  Free to read
  41. ^ Tom, Susan (October 1, 2000). "Bus mall dedication complete". Statesman Journal. p. 1C. Retrieved January 8, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.  Free to read
  42. ^ a b "Who We Are". Cherriots. Retrieved January 8, 2018. 
  43. ^ Roberts Murez, Cara (February 27, 2003). "Transit board discusses adding Keizer to names". Statesman Journal. p. 1C. Retrieved January 8, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.  Free to read
  44. ^ Roberts Murez, Cara (April 29, 2003). "Salem transit system has many options". Statesman Journal. p. 39. Retrieved January 9, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.  Free to read
  45. ^ Roberts Murez, Cara (October 8, 2004). "Downtown studied for possible streetcars". Statesman Journal. p. 4C. Retrieved January 9, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.  Free to read
  46. ^ Thompson Jr., Dennis (April 27, 2005). "Consultants release three streetcar plans". Statesman Journal. p. 1C. Retrieved January 9, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.  Free to read
  47. ^ Nelson\Nygaard (February 2005). "Central Salem Streetcar Feasibility Study" (PDF). Salem-Keizer Transit. Retrieved January 9, 2018. 
  48. ^ "How shall we move forward? Does Salem have the vision to spend money to make money – in transportation?". Salem Weekly. September 6, 2012. Retrieved January 9, 2018. 
  49. ^ "Cherriots considers adding weekend, evening service with new state funding". Statesman Journal. Retrieved 2017-08-29. 
  50. ^ "Governor Kate Brown to Sign Transportation Package". oregon.gov. Retrieved 2017-08-29. 
  51. ^ a b c d e "Freqeuently Asked Questions". Cherriots. Retrieved July 23, 2018. 
  52. ^ Wong, Peter (April 4, 2014). "Riders with visual impairments get crowd-free tour of Salem Transit Mall". Statesman Journal. Retrieved July 22, 2018. 
  53. ^ Doubleday, Russ (February 27, 2018). "Over the river and through the gridlock: I-5 by bus". Metro. Retrieved July 22, 2018. 
  54. ^ "Cherriots Regional: Connecting Marion and Polk Counties". Cherriots. Retrieved July 23, 2018. 
  55. ^ "Cherriots LIFT Ride Guide" (PDF). Cherriots. June 2017. Retrieved July 23, 2018. 
  56. ^ "Cherriots LIFT". Cherriots. Retrieved July 23, 2018. 
  57. ^ "Bus Purchases". Cherriots. Retrieved July 23, 2018. 
  58. ^ a b "Commercial Advertising on District Property RCF0020BW Addendum #2" (PDF). Salem Area Mass Transit District. April 4, 2017. p. 5. Retrieved January 8, 2018. 

External links[edit]