Sam Wells (filmmaker)

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Sam Wells (November 4, 1950 – June 3, 2011) was an American experimental filmmaker and photographer based in Princeton, New Jersey. He is best known for the film Wired Angel (1999),[1] an avant-garde feature inspired by the life and trial of Joan of Arc. Filmed on high-contrast black-and-white reversal film[2] and featuring a musical score written by Academy Award-winning composer Joe Renzetti, Wired Angel was well received at underground film festivals in both Chicago[3] and New York,[2][4] with Film Threat magazine naming it one of the best unseen films of 2001.[5]

Wells' 1990 short film The Talking Rain played at the 1991 Sundance Film Festival.[6] He exhibited sections of his Vietnam-inspired film and digital media installation Fragrance of Ghosts at William Paterson University in 2007.[7]

Wells was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2003.[8] In 2006, he was the recipient of an Artist Fellowship from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts.[9]

Filmography[edit]

  • Early Shorts (1974–1979)
    • Endymion
    • Woman of Light
    • Angels of Winter
    • Miari Miare Remir
    • Self Portrait
    • Crucifixion/Lux in diafana
    • Landscape
    • Realm
  • The Talking Rain (1990)
  • Wired Angel (1999)
  • Lucent Membranes (2008–2011)

Installations

  • Fragrance of Ghosts/Huong (2004–2011)
    • Kieu
    • Vinh Long Garden
    • The Willow Sees The Heron's Image Upside-Down

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Wired Angel (1999)". IMDb. 1 November 1999.
  2. ^ a b http://www.undergroundfilmjournal.com/movie-review-2001-nyuff-back-against-the-wall/
  3. ^ "Chicago Underground Film Festival". Chicago Reader.
  4. ^ Dennis Lim (21 January 2008). "Surreal Endgames, Seedy Glamour". villagevoice.com.
  5. ^ http://www.filmthreat.com/features/403/
  6. ^ "The Talking Rain". sundance.org.
  7. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2007-05-17. Retrieved 2011-06-08.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  8. ^ "John Simon Guggenheim Foundation - Fellows". gf.org.
  9. ^ "The principles of true art is not to portray, but to evoke". The principles of true art is not to portray, but to evoke. Archived from the original on 2010-07-03.

External links[edit]