Samuel Dana

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Samuel Dana
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Massachusetts's 4th district
In office
September 22, 1814 – March 3, 1815
Preceded by William M. Richardson
Succeeded by Asahel Stearns
Member of the Massachusetts
House of Representatives
In office
1803, 1825-1827
Member of the Massachusetts
State Senate
In office
1805-1812, 1817
President of the Massachusetts
State Senate
In office
1811–1812
Preceded by Harrison Gray Otis
Succeeded by John Phillips
In office
1807–1807
Preceded by John Bacon
Succeeded by Harrison Gray Otis
Personal details
Born June 26, 1767
Groton, Massachusetts
Died November 20, 1835
Charlestown, Massachusetts
Resting place Groton Cemetery
Political party Republican
Spouse(s) Rebecca Barrett (m. 1795)
Children 8
Parents Samuel Dana
Anna Kenrick Dana

Samuel Dana (June 26, 1767 – November 20, 1835) was an American lawyer and politician who served in both branches of the Massachusetts General Court, as President of the Massachusetts Senate and as a United States Representative from Massachusetts.[1]

Early life and education[edit]

Dana was born in Groton on June 26, 1767, the son of the clergyman Samuel and Anna (Kenrick) Dana.[1] Dana attended the local public schools and later studied law in the office of United States District Court Judge John Lowell, and was then admitted to the bar in 1789.[1]

Career[edit]

Dana practiced law in Groton, Massachusetts[1] and later in Charlestown, Massachusetts.[2] On October 14, 1811 Dana also was appointed as the Chief Justice of the Massachusetts Court of Common Pleas, he held that position for nine years.[3]

Dana was appointed postmaster January 1, 1801, he served as a member of the Massachusetts House of Representatives in 1803[3] in the State senate and served as President of the Massachusetts Senate. Dana served as attorney for Middlesex County from 1807 to 1811.[1]

Member of Congress[edit]

Dana was elected as a Democratic-Republican to the Thirteenth Congress to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of William M. Richardson. Dana served from September 22, 1814 to March 3, 1815. Dana was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1814 to the Fourteenth Congress.[4]

Later life[edit]

After his congressional service Dana resumed the practice law. Dana was a delegate to the State constitutional convention in 1820.[3] Dana was again a member of the Massachusetts House of Representatives from 1825-1827.[3]

Personal life[edit]

On December 5, 1795, Dana was married to Rebecca Barrett of New Ipswich, New Hampshire. Together, they had eight children, including a son, James Dana.[1]

Dana died in Charlestown, Massachusetts on November 20, 1835.[5] Dana was buried in Groton Cemetery.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Green, Samuel Abbott (1892), An Account of the Lawyers of Groton, Massachusetts: Including Natives who Have Practised Elsewhere, and Those Also who Have Studied Law in the Town. With an Appendix, Cambridge, Massachusetts: J. Wilson and Son, p. 33. 
  2. ^ Davis, William Thomas (1900), History of the Judiciary of Massachusetts: Including the Plymouth and Massachusetts Colonies, the Province of the Massachusetts Bay, and the Commonwealth, Boston, Massachusetts: Boston Book Company, p. 219 
  3. ^ a b c d e Green, Samuel Abbott (1892), An Account of the Lawyers of Groton, Massachusetts: Including Natives who Have Practised Elsewhere, and Those Also who Have Studied Law in the Town. With an Appendix, Cambridge, Massachusetts: J. Wilson and Son, p. 34. 
  4. ^ "DANA, Samuel - Biographical Information". bioguide.congress.gov. Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 13 November 2017. 
  5. ^ Davis, William Thomas (1900), History of the Judiciary of Massachusetts: Including the Plymouth and Massachusetts Colonies, the Province of the Massachusetts Bay, and the Commonwealth, Boston, Massachusetts: Boston Book Company, p. 220 

External links[edit]

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
William M. Richardson
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Massachusetts's 4th congressional district

September 22, 1814 - March 3, 1815
Succeeded by
Asahel Stearns
Political offices
Preceded by
John Bacon
President of the Massachusetts Senate
1807-1807
Succeeded by
Harrison Gray Otis
Preceded by
Harrison Gray Otis
President of the Massachusetts Senate
1811-1812
Succeeded by
John Phillips