Samuel Sommers

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Samuel R. Sommers
Alma mater Williams College (B.A., 1997), University of Michigan (M.A., 1999; Ph.D., 2002)[1]
Known for Work on racial stereotyping and racial prejudice
Awards Fellow of the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues since 2011, 2008 Saleem Shah Award for Early Career Excellence from the American Psychology-Law Society
Scientific career
Fields Social psychology
Institutions Tufts University
Thesis Race and juries: The effects of race-salience and racial composition on individual and group decision-making (2002)
Website samsommers.com

Samuel R. Sommers is an American social psychologist and associate professor of psychology at Tufts University. He is known for his research on implicit racial stereotyping and color-blind racism.[2][3] For example, he has published multiple studies on the effects of increased racial diversity in mock juries.[4][5] With Michael Norton, he also published a study in 2011 showing that, on average, white people think more racism against them exists than exists against black people.[6]

Honors and awards[edit]

Sommers has been a fellow of the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues since 2011. In 2009, he received the Gerald R. Gill Professor of the Year Award from Tufts. In 2008, he received the Saleem Shah Award for Early Career Excellence from the American Psychology-Law Society.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Samuel Sommers Curriculum Vitae" (PDF). Tufts University. Retrieved 18 June 2017. 
  2. ^ Mitchell, Robert (3 November 2015). "Being colorblind to race is not the answer". Harvard Gazette. Retrieved 18 June 2017. 
  3. ^ Jacobs, Tom (15 January 2015). "Unconscious Racial Bias Taints the Legal System". Pacific Standard. Retrieved 18 June 2017. 
  4. ^ Sasso, Anne (5 May 2006). "Group Diversity: Mock Juries Reveal Surprising Effects of Diversity on Groups". Science. Retrieved 18 June 2017. 
  5. ^ O'Connor, E. (March 2001). "Study results show white jurors still demonstrate racial bias". Monitor. American Psychological Association. Retrieved 18 June 2017. 
  6. ^ "Racism As A Zero-Sum Game". NPR. 13 July 2011. Retrieved 18 June 2017. 

External links[edit]