Santa Monica Stairs

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Santa Monica Stairs
Stairway
Steps:
  • 160 (7th–Entrada)
  • 187-89 (4th–Ocean
Height:
  • 109 feet (33 m) (7th–Entrada)
  • 111 feet (34 m) (4th–Ocean)
Surface: concrete,wood
Location: Santa Monica, California
Coordinates: 34°1′55″N 118°30′46″W / 34.03194°N 118.51278°W / 34.03194; -118.51278Coordinates: 34°1′55″N 118°30′46″W / 34.03194°N 118.51278°W / 34.03194; -118.51278

Santa Monica Stairs are a pair of outdoor staircases in California near Pacific Palisades descending Santa Monica Canyon to the northwest from Adelaide Drive.(4th Street & Adelaide Drive, Santa Monica, California 90402)

Details[edit]

The one that begins near the intersection of 7th Street leads to Entrada Drive. It consists of a mixture of wooden and concrete flights in a straight path, about 5.5 feet wide, separated by three horizontal landings. Altogether there are 160-170 steps producing an overall vertical change of about 109 feet. (roughly similar to an 8 story building)

The one that begins near the intersection of 4th Street leads to Ocean Avenue Ext. It consists solely of concrete flights interconnected by right- and left-hand turns. There are 187-189 steps producing an overall vertical change of about 111 feet.

Several other lengthy staircases nearby descend from Palisades Park bluffs to overpasses crossing Pacific Coast Highway to the beach:

  • One near Montana Avenue has 168 steps rising about 105 feet above PCH.
  • One near Idaho Avenue has 48 steps rising about 30 feet above the California Incline.
  • One near Arizona Avenue has 111 steps rising about 65 feet above PCH.
  • One near Broadway has about 30 steps rising about 50 feet above PCH.

Controversy[edit]

Some area residents have complained that the stairs have become too popular, and attract too many exercisers to the wealthy neighborhood of multimillion-dollar properties.[1][2][3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ben Tracy (February 18, 2009). "Santa Monica's Disputed Steps". CBS News TV report. Retrieved February 24, 2010. 
  2. ^ "Where the Traffic Median Is a No-Pilates Zone". New York Times. 2008-11-25. Retrieved 2013-09-03. 
  3. ^ "The Most Popular Gym Is the City Itself". New York Times. 2010-06-06. Retrieved 2013-09-03. 

External links[edit]