Sarcophagine

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Sarcophagine
Sarcophagine.svg
Names
Preferred IUPAC name
3,6,10,13,16,19-Hexazabicyclo[6.6.6]icosane
Other names
Sar chelate
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
  • InChI=1S/C14H32N6/c1-2-16-8-14-11-19-5-3-17-9-13(7-15-1)10-18-4-6-20-12-14/h13-20H,1-12H2
    Key: NVOVSXGZALWAFS-UHFFFAOYSA-N
  • C1CNCC2CNCCNCC(CN1)CNCCNC2
Properties
C14H32N6
Molar mass 284.452 g·mol−1
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).

Sarcophagine (Sar) is a bicyclic cage-like metal chelator molecule.[1] derived from cyclam. Chemical formula of sarcophagine is 3,6,10,13,16,19-hexaazabicyclo(6,6,6)icosane[2] and additional functional groups are often linked to this structure, such as in DiAmSar (1,8-diamino-Sar). This and many related hexadentate clathrochelates are prepared by template reactions.[3]

Chemical structure of DiAmSar

Sarcophagine derivatives are used, for example, as ligands in radiopharmaceuticals that require incorporating a radioactive metal cation into an organic and/or biological structure, such as an antibody.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Efficient Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Novel Bi-Functionalized Sarcophagine for 64Cu Radiopharmaceuticals". www.thno.org. Retrieved 2017-10-06.
  2. ^ Pubchem. "Diamsar chelate". pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. Retrieved 2017-10-06.
  3. ^ Gahan, L. R.; Harrowfield, J. M. (2015). "Sepulchrate: Four decades on". Polyhedron. 94: 1–51. doi:10.1016/j.poly.2015.03.036.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: uses authors parameter (link)
  4. ^ Liu, Shuanglong; Li, Zibo; Conti, Peter S. (2014-04-03). "Development of Multi-Functional Chelators Based on Sarcophagine Cages". Molecules. 19 (4): 4246–4255. doi:10.3390/molecules19044246. PMC 6270798. PMID 24705567.