Saskatchewan Research Council

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Saskatchewan Research Council
TypeCrown Corporation
IndustryResearch
Founded1947
HeadquartersSaskatoon, Regina & Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, Canada
Key people
Mike Crabtree, Chief Executive Officer (April 1, 2019-)[1]
ProductsResearch
Number of employees
251-500[2]
Websitewww.src.sk.ca
SRC Facility

The Saskatchewan Research Council (SRC) is a provincial treasury board crown corporation engaged in research and technology development on behalf of the provincial government and private industry.[3] It focuses on applied research and development projects that generate profit.[4] Some of its funding comes from government grants, but it generates the balance from selling products and services.[5] With nearly 300 employees and $137 million in annual revenues, SRC is the second largest research and technology organization in Canada.[6]

History[edit]

The Province of Saskatchewan established SRC in 1947.[7][8] SRC carried out its work through grants-in-aid to specific applied research activities at the University of Saskatchewan.[9] Saskatchewan Research Council's first Director of Research was Thorbergur Thorvaldson, head of the university's chemistry department.[9][10]

In 1954, SRC expanded its mandate to incorporate independent research. Under Warren's direction, SRC opened its own laboratories in 1958 and then expanded in 1963.[11][6] In 1986 the research and development branch of SaskOil was transferred to SRC.[12]

Research[edit]

SRC's research history includes developing a residential energy conservation research report that was used in the National Building Code of Canada.[9] SRC also mapped the groundwater resources in Saskatchewan south of the Precambrian Shield.[9] Its scientists evaluated Saskatchewan's extensive lignite (coal) resources. SRC's GenServe Laboratories were involved in testing for bovine spongiform encephalopathy (Mad Cow disease).[9] SRC is also known for building the Factor 9 home, which uses 90 per cent less energy and 50 per cent less water than a similar home built during the 1970s.[13] In the past they housed a SLOWPOKE-II nuclear research reactor (that had 16 kW thermal power) that performed analytical tests. SRC's SLOWPOKE-2 reactor operated from 1981 until being shut down in December 2017. Decommissioning was expected to be completed sometime in 2020.[14] In the early 2000s, SRC developed a suite of dual-fuel hydrogen vehicles that led to the launch of Saskatchewan’s first hydrogen fuelling station in 2010[15]

Current research is conducted in a range of laboratories and test facilities.[5] SRC's Environmental Analytical Laboratories provide environmental monitoring and other tests to clients.[16] Its Geoanalytical Laboratory provides geochemical analyses for the mineral exploration industry.[17] Other labs include Petroleum Analytical Laboratories, a Biofuels Test Centre,[18] a Pipe Flow Technology Centre,[19] and a diamond testing facility.[20] SRC is contracted by the Government of Saskatchewan to manage the thirty-seven abandoned mines and mill sites near Lake Athabasca through Project CLEANS.[21]

In 2017, SRC launched the Centre for the Demonstration of Emissions Reduction (CeDER), a test and verification facility to help industry manage and reduce its GHG emissions.[22]

In 2020, SRC was awarded $31 million dollars in funding for a first-of-its-kind Rare Earth Processing Facility in Saskatchewan.[23]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "Saskatchewan Research Council Announces New CEO". Government of Saskatchewan. Retrieved 15 May 2022.
  2. ^ "Top Employer: Saskatchewan Research Council". reviews.canadastop100.com. Retrieved 15 May 2022.
  3. ^ "Our Company". Saskatchewan Research Council. Retrieved 13 February 2020.
  4. ^ "Crown Corporations of Saskatchewan | Saskatchewan Cabinet, Ministries, Agencies and Other Governments". Government of Saskatchewan. Retrieved 16 May 2022.
  5. ^ a b "About Us". Saskatchewan Research Council. Retrieved 16 May 2022.
  6. ^ a b "SRC Shows Strong Performance In 2020-21 Despite Covid-19 Pandemic | News and Media". Government of Saskatchewan. August 3, 2021. Retrieved 16 May 2022.
  7. ^ "History". Saskatchewan Research Council. Retrieved 16 May 2022.
  8. ^ Schramm, Laurie (March 7, 2017). "History of SRC: The Early Years (1947-72)". Saskatchewan Research Council. Retrieved 16 May 2022.
  9. ^ a b c d e Peters, Judy. "Saskatchewan Research Council (SRC)". The Encyclopedia of Saskatchewan. Government of Saskatchewan. Retrieved 16 May 2022.
  10. ^ Houston, Stuart. "Continuing the prairie saga". Lögberg-Heimskringla. Retrieved 16 May 2022.
  11. ^ McNicholl, Martin K.; Tofani, Rick (December 16, 2013). "Saskatchewan Research Council". The Canadian Encyclopedia. Retrieved 16 May 2022.
  12. ^ Hanly, David. "SaskOil". The Encyclopedia of Saskatchewan. Government of Saskatchewan. Retrieved 16 May 2022.
  13. ^ Dumont, Rob (September 3, 2010). "Home Energy Magazine - Water Efficiency :: Monitoring Results for the Factor 9 Home". www.homeenergy.org. Retrieved 16 May 2022.
  14. ^ Shield, David (4 January 2019). "'It was very unique': Saskatoon's SLOWPOKE-2 research reactor shutting down after 37 years". Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 29 November 2019.
  15. ^ Gotto, Rebecca (April 7, 2020). "The History of Alternative Fuels Vehicle Work at SRC: Part Two". Saskatchewan Research Council. Retrieved 16 May 2022.
  16. ^ "Environmental Analytical Laboratories". Saskatchewan Research Council. Retrieved 16 May 2022.
  17. ^ "Geoanalytical Laboratories". Saskatchewan Research Council. Retrieved 16 May 2022.
  18. ^ "Petroleum Analytical Laboratories". Saskatchewan Research Council. Retrieved 16 May 2022.
  19. ^ "Pipe Flow Technology Centre™". Saskatchewan Research Council. Retrieved 16 May 2022.
  20. ^ "Diamonds". Saskatchewan Research Council. Retrieved 16 May 2022.
  21. ^ Schramm, Laurier L. (January 2012). "Cleaning-Up Abandoned Uranium Mines in Saskatchewan's North" (PDF). Retrieved 16 May 2022.
  22. ^ "APEGS » FEATURES : SRC Centre for the Demonstration of Emissions Reductions". Association of Professional Engineers & Geoscientists of Saskatchewan. Retrieved 16 May 2022.
  23. ^ "Saskatchewan To Create Canada's First Rare Earth Processing Facility At SRC | News and Media". Government of Saskatchewan. August 27, 2020. Retrieved 16 May 2022.

External links[edit]