Scott W. Williams

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Scott Williams (born April 22, 1943 in Staten Island, New York) is a Professor of Mathematics at the University at Buffalo, SUNY.

Education[edit]

He was raised in Baltimore, Maryland. Williams attended Morgan State University and earned his bachelor degree of Science in Mathematics in 1964.

Before earning his bachelor's degree he was already able to solve four advanced problems in The Mathematical Monthly and co-authored two papers on Non-Associative Algebra with his undergraduate advisor Dr. Volodymir Bohun-Chudyniv. Scott Williams earned his Masters of Science in Mathematics from Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania in 1967, and in 1969, he earned his Ph.D and M.S from Lehigh University.

Career[edit]

Williams served as a Research Associate in the Department of Mathematics at Pennsylvania State University - University Park, from 1969 to 1971. In 1971, he was chosen to be Assistant Professor of Mathematics at State University of New York and in 1985 was promoted to Full Professor at the University. In 2004, he was selected to be one of the 50 Most Important Blacks in Research Science by Science Spectrum Magazine and Career Communications Group.[citation needed]

He was the first one to use the notion of scales to the box product problem.[citation needed]

Williams is very well known[by whom?] for his studies in topology and his innovations in that field of mathematics. In 1975, he was the first topologist to apply the concept of scales (now known as b=d) to give a partial solution of the famous Box Product problem, which is still unsettled today. Dr. Williams is one of two founders[citation needed] of Black and Third World Mathematicians, which in 1971 became The National Association of Mathematicians. Together with Willam Massey of Lucent Technologies, Dr. Williams founded The Committee for African American Researchers in the Mathematical Sciences in 1997.[citation needed]

Personal "home" pages[edit]

Scott W. Williams (apparently abbreviated "sww" sometimes) seems to have at least two personal home pages (or "websites") on "SUNYAB" (University at Buffalo or "UB") servers:

The one on the "math" [department] server may have already existed long before the "acsu" server was established as the standard place for (quote) :

"the personal websites for UB faculty, staff and students."[1]

to reside on the world wide web.

References

  1. ^ "Personal Websites". UB. Retrieved April 21, 2015. This web server provides the personal websites for UB faculty, staff and students