Self-storage box

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Self storage boxes (also known as "self-storage bins") offer people living in metropolitan areas storage bins for rental.[1] The storage bin rental client-base includes businesses and individuals.

The storage box service distinguishes itself from the traditional self storage business by providing on-demand pick-up and drop-off services to storage facilities.[2]

Description[edit]

Self-storage rental bins are mostly lockable robust boxes made from hard plastic and tend to offer enough space for household goods or small goods such as clothing, electronic articles, folders, shoes or books. They typically have a capacity of at least 80 liters and a weigh around 100 pounds.[3][4]

The storage bins are usually picked up from the tenants' location to make storage easier for customers. Some operators enhance the service with high tech options such as photographic inventory of bins and ability to order back bins using the pictures as reference, providing live driver tracking and the ability to use smart phone applications to view storage, add more storage or request storage returns. The self-storage box service makes self-storage more transparent and offers its tenants a virtual visual catalogue from which single items can be ordered back. Tenants are usually charged a fine for pickup and delivery, as well as a monthly fee for the storage at self-storage facilities.

As prices for the small storage bins range between $5.00-$10. per, they are increasingly becoming a popular storage option in both consumer and commercial applications. https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-02-04/the-real-life-storage-wars

Bloomberg News cites the dramatic increase in demand over supply as being the primary reason for the bin storage option becoming so popular in cities like New York.


Unlike traditional self-storage facilities which are visited by tentants themselves who physically store stuff on their own, providers of self-storage boxes offer to simplify the storage process by providing clients with more transparency and on-demand services.[5]

Self storage boxes internationally== Threat to traditional Self Storage industry[edit]

As major cities run short of living space, self-storage boxes are now becoming a relevant service in many parts of the world. The service is particularly attractive to clients because its pick-up services save time and effort for the inhabitants of metropolitan areas such as Hong Kong, New York City,[6]London,[7] Berlin, but in particularly in the Asian world.[8]

Possible threat to the Self Storage industry. Business analysts continue to monitor the space closely to follow the possible intrusion into the Self-Storage market. https://www.slideshare.net/slideshow/embed_code/key/dhVZSRyVmsJoGm Key Banc identifies the major NYC startups as RedBin, Makespace, Clutter and Box Butler. Although only RedBin keeps to the original bin storage model, the others have pivoted to offer full service moving and storage services.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "TechCity Insider "SpaceWays makes room for improvement"". Techcityinsider.net. 2014-08-28. Retrieved 2015-05-18. 
  2. ^ "TechCrunch "MakeSpace, A Dropbox For Real Life Storage, Launches In New York Today, Having Raised $1.3M"". TechCrunch.com. 2013-09-26. Retrieved 2015-05-21. 
  3. ^ "Reuters "Rocket Internet launches pick-up and storage business in Britain"". Reuters. 2014-07-03. Retrieved 2015-05-21. 
  4. ^ "TechCrunch "Samwer Brothers' Cloning Rocket Goes to Warp Speed"". Bloomberg. 2014-07-02. Retrieved 2015-05-22. 
  5. ^ "TechCrunch "American Re-Urbanization Drives More On-Demand Innovation"". TechCrunch.com. 2014-12-16. Retrieved 2015-05-22. 
  6. ^ "New York Times "In a Crowded City, Storage Rooms With Amenities"". NYTimes.com. 2013-01-23. Retrieved 2015-05-22. 
  7. ^ "DailyMail "Space mission: The storage-starved Britons who pay £350m a year for a place to keep their essentials (and their Star Wars figures)". DailyMail.co.uk. 2011-07-16. Retrieved 2015-05-19. 
  8. ^ "Asia One "Boom in self-storage industry"". AsiaOne Business. 2015-03-02. Retrieved 2015-05-22.