Seymour Cocks

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Seymour Cocks
CBE
Member of Parliament
for Broxtowe
In office
30 May 1929 – 29 May 1953
Preceded by George Alfred Spencer
Succeeded by William Warbey
Personal details
Born Frederick Seymour Cocks
(1882-10-25)25 October 1882
Darlington, County Durham, England, UK
Died 29 May 1953(1953-05-29) (aged 70)
Hendon
Political party Labour
Other political
affiliations
Independent Labour Party
External image
Photographic portrait of Cocks in the National Portrait Gallery, London. Taken by Walter Stoneman, 13 January 1950.

Frederick Seymour Cocks, CBE (25 October 1882 – 29 May 1953) was a British Labour Party Member of Parliament (MP).

Born in Darlington, Cocks was educated at Plymouth College and became a journalist. He joined the Independent Labour Party and wrote several tracts for the party and for the Union of Democratic Control. He stood unsuccessfully for Maidstone in the 1923 general election. He was elected to the safe seat of Broxtowe in the 1929 general election.

After World War II it was revealed that he had been placed on the 'Special Search List G.B' of prominent subjects to be arrested by the Nazis had they succeeded in invading Britain.

He is also an author of an important biography of noted humanitarian and fellow Labour Party member E. D. Morel, E.D. Morel, The Man and his work.

Cocks held Broxtowe until his death in Hendon in 1953 aged 70.

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Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
George Alfred Spencer
Member of Parliament for Broxtowe
19291953
Succeeded by
William Warbey