Sheldon Bach

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Sheldon Bach is a psychologist and psychoanalyst living in New York City.[1][2] Born in 1925, he served in the European Theatre of Operations during World War II, then lived in Paris where he studied at the Sorbonne. He joined the Research Center for Mental Health at New York University in 1956, where he worked with George S. Klein and Leo Goldberger. He is currently Adjunct Clinical Professor of Psychology at the NYU Postdoctoral Program in Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis[3] and a Fellow of the International Psychoanalytical Association.[4]

Awards[edit]

In 2007 he was the recipient of the Heinz Hartmann Award for "outstanding contributions to the theory and practice of psychoanalysis." His Hartmann Lecture was published and reviewed the following year.[5][6] In 2016 he was chosen by the Institute for Psychoanalytic Training and Research to give the Norbert Freedman Memorial Lecture at the New School. In that same year he gave the 51st Freud Lecture at the Institute for Psychoanalytic Education at NYU Medical School.

Books[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Psychoanalytic Profiles": In: Psychologist-Psychoanalyst: Official Publication of Division 39 of the American Psychological Association. Volume XXVI, No. 4, Fall 2006 pp.5-8
  2. ^ HealthGrades professional profile
  3. ^ NYU Postdoctoral Program in Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis
  4. ^ NYU PPP Program faculty list
  5. ^ Jenny Putnam & Lewis Aron "Psychoanalytic Healing, Love, Life, and Death: Commentary on Paper by Sheldon Bach". In: Psychoanalytic Dialogues, Volume 18 Issue 6 2008, pps. 795-811
  6. ^ International Psychoanalysis website