Sid Boyum

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Two of Sid Boyum's sculptures "Man-Eating Mushroom" and "Blue Urn with Dragon" in Jackson Square in Madison, Wisconsin.

Sidney "Sid" Edward Boyum (1914 – February 22, 1991) was an industrial photographer, sculptor and graphic artist in Madison, Wisconsin, United States.[1] Much of his work falls into the category of outsider art.[2] Today, Boyum is best known for his public sculptures scattered throughout the Schenk-Atwood-Starkweather-Yahara Neighborhood[3] on Madison's east side.[4][5]

In addition to these publicly exhibited works, dozens of other totemic concrete sculptures still crowd the back yard of Boyum's former home and studio, now abandoned. Efforts are underway to preserve Boyum's home and art.[6] Each year from 1963 to 1989, The Wisconsin State Journal commissioned Boyum to draw a different full-page, poster commemorating the opening of the Wisconsin fishing season.[7] During his lifetime, Boyum also produced thousands of photographs (including a number of whimsical self-portraits), 16-millimeter films, drawings, paintings and bas-relief works.

Boyum was a close friend, collaborator and influence on other Wisconsin artists and collectors, including Baraboo's Tom Every (A.K.A. "Doctor Evermor"),[8] creator of the Forevertron[9] and Alex Jordan, Jr creator of the House on the Rock.[10][11][12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Sidney Boyum, Sculptor, Dies". The Capital Times. February 27, 1991. p. 8. Retrieved March 10, 2019 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  2. ^ Rajer, Anton (1999). "Sid Boyum's Sculpture: The Challenge of Preserving Folk Art Environments". Folk Art Society of America. Folk Art Society of America. Retrieved 2015-10-15
  3. ^ "Madison Neighborhood Profile: Schenk-Atwood-Starkweather-Yahara Neighborhood Association". www.cityofmadison.com. Retrieved 2019-05-30.
  4. ^ "Art in public places: Sid Boyum’s concrete sculptures find new homes on Madison’s East Side". Quintessential Madison. Retrieved 2015-10-19.
  5. ^ "Design Coalition". www.designcoalition.org. Retrieved 2019-05-30.
  6. ^ kstein@madison.com, 608-252-6143, KATE STEIN. "Sid Boyum property auction moved to 2016". madison.com. Retrieved 2019-05-30.
  7. ^ Wisconsin Historical Society, Sid Boyum, Opening Day Fishing Poster, Image ID 121626. Viewed online at (http://www.wisconsinhistory.org/Content.aspx?dsNav=Ny:True,N:4294963828-4294955414&dsNavOnly=Ntk:All%7CSid+Boyum+Collection%7C3%7C,Ny:True,Ro:0&dsRecordDetails=R:IM121626)
  8. ^ Kupsch, Tom "A Mythic Obsession: The World of Dr. Evermor" Chicago Review Press, 2008, pp. 19-21, https://books.google.com/books?id=HHQ5V4sGqRgC&pg=PA19&lpg=PA19&dq=sid+boyum&source=bl&ots=JzxGU9jGVx&sig=qFcg1G7a_bq4soYy7Rv0lt4tRbI&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiCu8bwiaHKAhVIVj4KHeTqBn84PBDoAQgrMAM#v=onepage&q=sid%20boyum&f=false
  9. ^ http://www.wisconsinvisualartists.com/public/article_full.php?user_id=271
  10. ^ Balousek, Marv (1990). House of Alex. Oregon, Wis.: Waubesa Press. ISBN 1878569066
  11. ^ House on the Rock, "Did Alex Jordan Build The House on the Rock to Spite Frank Lloyd Wright?" http://www.thehouseontherock.com/PDFs/PR/AlexandFLW.pdf
  12. ^ "Boyum Was Friend to Many". Wisconsin State Journal. February 28, 1991. p. 15. Retrieved March 11, 2019 – via Newspapers.com. open access

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