Silas Hoadley

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Silas Hoadley clock face

Silas Hoadley (1786 – December 28, 1870) was an American clockmaker.

Biography[edit]

Hoadley was born in Bethany, Connecticut and was a cousin of the architect and builder David Hoadley. He received little formal education before becoming apprentice carpenter to his uncle Calvin Hoadley. Hoadley was a Free Mason of high standing and one of the most respected and oldest members of Harmony lodge, No. 42 F. and A. M. having been intimately associated with the lodge in Watertown, Connecticut in 1817. his lodge bears testimony that "His heart was in the right place, with a hand as open as the day to meeting charity, of him it may be truly said an honest man is the noblest work of god".[1]

In 1809 his apprenticeship ended, and he formed a clock-making partnership in Plymouth, Connecticut with Eli Terry and Seth Thomas as Terry, Thomas & Hoadley.[2][3]

The partners gradually withdrew to create their own firms – Terry in 1810, Thomas in 1814 – leaving Silas Hoadley as sole owner. He continued to make clocks until 1849.[4]

Hoadley was elected to the Connecticut General Assembly several times, and in 1844 to the Connecticut State Senate. He died at Plymouth, Connecticut.

Family Life[edit]

Hoadley was married to Sarah N. Painter Hoadley (they are buried together in West Cemetery, and share a stone). His children where Milo, born July 25, 1809, married Sarah E. Scoville; George Thompson, born September 11, 1811, married Eunice Tomlinson; Luther Hopkins, born July 29, 1813, married first, Jane E. Welton, second Ellen Nicholson; Sarah Jane, born June 22, 1817, married September 1832, Hon. Henry A. Mitchel of Bristol, CT; Mary ann, born may 4, 1814, married first, September 2, 1836, George B. Semour, Washington, CT, second, June 17, George Tomlinson of Plymouth, CT[5]

Death[edit]

Hoadley died on December 28, 1870 and is interred at West Cemetery in Plymouth, Connecticut.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Anderson, Joseph, Sarah J. Prichard, and Anna Lydia Ward. The Town and City of Waterbury, Connecticut from the Aboriginal Period to the Year Eighteen Hundred and Ninety-five. New Haven: Price and Lee, 1896. Print
  2. ^ "Sarah N. Painter Hoadley". Find A Grave. Retrieved September 19, 2012. 
  3. ^ "Seth Thomas". Encyclopædia Britannica Online. Retrieved September 19, 2012. 
  4. ^ "Silas Hoadley". Find A Grave. Retrieved September 19, 2012. 
  5. ^ Anderson, Joseph, Sarah J. Prichard, and Anna Lydia Ward. The Town and City of Waterbury, Connecticut from the Aboriginal Period to the Year Eighteen Hundred and Ninety-five. New Haven: Price and Lee, 1896. Print

External links[edit]