Roger Manwood

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Sir Roger Manwood.

Sir Roger Manwood (1525–1592) was an English jurist and Lord Chief Baron of the Exchequer.

Career[edit]

Sir Roger was the son of Thomas Manwood of Sandwich in Kent. He trained as a barrister at the Inner Temple and attained the highest and most prestigious order of counsel, namely serjeant-at-law. He was ultimately appointed Lord Chief Baron of the Exchequer in 1578 and served Queen Elizabeth I until 1592. He was MP for Hastings in 1555 and Sandwich in 1558, 1559, 1563, 1571 and 1572.[1]

A memorable quote from him is:

Philanthropy[edit]

Sir Roger lived in Sandwich and then at Hackington near Canterbury. He was a notable philanthropist, having provided a significant amount of money for the foundation in 1563 of Sir Roger Manwood's School in Sandwich, Kent, a free school to bring education to the townspeople whose families could not afford it.

Death[edit]

Sir Roger died on 14 December 1592. Christopher Marlowe, the well-known Elizabethan playwright and poet, wrote a eulogy in Latin after Manwood's death, entitled 'On the Death of Sir Roger Manwood'.

Note[edit]

He is apparently sometimes mistakenly referred to as "Richard Manwood" (e.g. in the biography of Richard Boyle). He was a close relative, probably uncle, of John Manwood, a barrister of Lincoln's Inn, gamekeeper of Waltham Forest, and Justice in Eyre of the New Forest under Elizabeth I of England.

References[edit]

Legal offices
Preceded by
Sir John Jeffery
Lord Chief Baron of the Exchequer
1578–1592
Succeeded by
Sir William Peryam