Sodium orthosilicate

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Sodium orthosilicate
Sodium orthosilicate.svg
Chemical structure of sodium orthosilicate
Names
IUPAC name
Tetrasodium silicate
Other names
Sodium orthosilicate
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.033.387 Edit this at Wikidata
EC Number
  • 236-741-3
UNII
UN number 1759
  • InChI=1S/4Na.O4Si/c;;;;1-5(2,3)4/q4*+1;-4 checkY
    Key: POWFTOSLLWLEBN-UHFFFAOYSA-N checkY
  • InChI=1S/4Na.O4Si/c;;;;1-5(2,3)4/q4*+1;-4
    Key: POWFTOSLLWLEBN-UHFFFAOYSA-N
  • [O-][Si]([O-])([O-])[O-].[Na+].[Na+].[Na+].[Na+]
Properties
Na4O4Si
Molar mass 184.040 g·mol−1
Appearance White powder
Melting point 1,018 °C (1,864 °F; 1,291 K)
Hazards
GHS labelling:
GHS05: CorrosiveGHS07: Exclamation mark[1]
Danger[1]
H302, H314, H335[1]
P260, P301+P330+P331, P303+P361+P353, P305+P351+P338, P405, P501[1]
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
☒N (what is checkY☒N ?)

Sodium orthosilicate is the chemical compound with the molecular formula Na
4
SiO
4
. It is one of the sodium silicates, specifically an orthosilicate, formally a salt of the unstable orthosilicic acid H
4
SiO
4
.[2][3][4]

Uses[edit]

Sodium orthosilicate has been considered as an interfacial tension reducing additive in the waterflooding of oil fields for enhanced oil extraction. In laboratory settings, it was found to be more effective than sodium hydroxide for some types of oil.[5]

Sodium orthosilicate has been found to stabilize ferrate films as an anticorrosion treatment of iron and steel surfaces.[6]

Natural occurrence[edit]

Sodium orthosilicate has not been found in nature. However, the mineral chesnokovite, chemically the related salt disodium dihydrogen orthosilicate [Na+
]2[SiO
2
(OH)2−
2
] · 8H
2
O
, was recently identified in the Kola Peninsula.[7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Sodium Orthosilicate". American Elements. Retrieved September 18, 2018.
  2. ^ Baur, Werner H.; Halwax, Erich; Völlenkle, Horst (1986). "Comparison of the crystal structures of sodium orthosilicate, Na
    4
    SiO
    4
    , and sodium orthogermanate, Na
    4
    GeO
    4
    ". Monatshefte für Chemie Chemical Monthly. 117 (6–7): 793–797. doi:10.1007/BF00810070. S2CID 92420380.
  3. ^ M,. G. Barker, P. G.Gadd (1981): "The preparation and crystal structure of sodium orthosilicate, Na
    4
    SiO
    4
    ." Journal of Chemical Research, London] Chemical Society, volume 9, pages S:274 (synopse), M:3446-3466 (main).
  4. ^ Schairer, J. F.; Bowen, N. L. (1956). "The system Na
    2
    O
    Al
    2
    O
    3
    SiO
    2
    ". American Journal of Science. 254 (3): 129–195. Bibcode:1956AmJS..254..129S. doi:10.2475/ajs.254.3.129.
  5. ^ Campbell, Thomas C. (1977). "A Comparison of Sodium Orthosilicate and Sodium Hydroxide for Alkaline Waterflooding". All Days. Society of Petroleum engineers, SPE California Regional Meeting 13–15 April 1977, Bakersfield. doi:10.2118/6514-MS.
  6. ^ John R. Harrison (1954): "Process for treating metals with ferrate solution". US Patent US2850415A, assigned to E. I. du Pont de Nemours
  7. ^ Pekov, I. V.; Chukanov, N. V.; Zadov, A. E.; Zubkova, N. V.; Pushcharovsky, D. Yu. (2007). "Chesnokovite, Na2[SiO2(OH)2] · 8H2O, the first natural sodium orthosilicate from the Lovozero alkaline pluton, Kola Peninsula: Description and crystal structure of a new mineral species". Geology of Ore Deposits. 49 (8): 727–738. Bibcode:2007GeoOD..49..727P. doi:10.1134/S1075701507080077. S2CID 94817330.