Sonic Animation

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Sonic Animation
OriginMelbourne, Victoria, Australia
Genres
Years active
  • 1994 (1994)–2006 (2006)
  • (2011 (2011)–present
Labels
Associated actsScarlet Garden
Websitesonicanimation.com
Members
  • Adrian Cartwright
  • Bosco Martin
  • Ronnie Winter
  • Jason Einstein
  • Primus Baxter
Past members
  • Steve Bertschik
  • Rupert Keiller
  • Mark Saul
  • Richard Falkner
  • Erica Mclean

Sonic Animation (stylised as sonicanimation) are an Australian dance and techno musical group which was formed by Adrian Cartwright on keyboards, drums and programming and Rupert Keiller on lead vocals and programming in 1994. The group disbanded in 2006 and then reformed in 2011. Altogether, they have released five studio albums, Silence Is Deafening (May 1997), Orchid for the Afterworld (October 1999), Reality by Deception (2002), Defective Perspective (2004) and Once More from the Bottom (March 2013).

History[edit]

1994-1998: Formation and Silence Is Deafening[edit]

Sonic Animation were formed in Melbourne by Steve Bertschik as a DJ, Adrian Cartwright on drums, keyboards and programming and Canadian-born Rupert Keiller on lead vocals and programming in 1994.[1][2][3] Cartwright on drums and Keiller on vocals were both members of Scarlet Garden, a rock group formed in the early 1990s in Geelong.[2][4] The pair had met as employees at a local graphic design business.[4]

Cartwright recalled "I absolutely hated dance music ... But Rupert took me to a rave, and that was it for me. I'd always thought that dance music was so minimalist and easy, but when you get into it it's actually quite intricate and complex. I loved that. And then when we heard what Underworld were doing with vocals, we wanted to do that, too."[4] In 1995 Sonic Animation released their debut single, "Time Is an Illusion", on a self-funded independent label.[2][5] They followed with "From Sand to Stars", Zero Zero Zero Zero One and Force Feed.[3][6]

Their debut studio album, Silence Is Deafening, was issued on Azwan Transmissions in May 1997.[7] All the tracks were written, produced and engineered by Sonic Animation. At that time they were using a 386 computer for programming.[8] In March 2002 Keiller recalled how "people would yell out 'nice one 386!', cos you know, we didn't really do anything, it was all just the computer. There are still some people that hold that view but we don't see it as much because of the kind of shows we play these, days."[8] Bertschik left the group in 1998 to "pursue his own musical interests."[7] The band signed with a new label: Global Recordings / Festival / FIIDO.[7]

1999-2005: Commercial success[edit]

In January 1999 the group issued a single, "Love Lies Bleeding", which reached the ARIA Singles Chart top 50.[9] Jasper Lee of Oz Music Project felt that it "builds up into full blown dance goodness with no doubt an anthem to club culture with the main vocal".[10] Its lyrics contain a reference to illegal drugs, "I feel ecstasy".[10] This initially concerned Keiller "I used to be worried about that sort of stuff — I don't know why — but nothing so far has happened."[8] "Theophilus Thistler" was released as a single in August 1999, which received high rotation on national radio station, Triple J,[11] its popularity was assisted by the track's associated music video.[12] The video featured their two mascots, or TechoTubbies, dubbed Robert Roley and Theophilus Thistler.[2] At live performances the mascots' suits are worn by two fans selected by the band via their web site.[8] "Theophilus Thistler" appeared on the ARIA Singles Chart top 100 and was listed at No. 18 on the Triple J Hottest 100, 1999, in a listeners poll.[11]

The group's second studio album, Orchid for the Afterworld, was issued on 11 October 1999 on Global Records which peaked at No. 42 on the ARIA Albums Chart.[9] In 2005 the album was certified gold for shipment of 35,000 copies by ARIA.[13] Lee attended their gig in April 2000 at Macquarie University, he noticed "a weird mix of a rave and a mosh, with those up the front of the crowd firmly squashed in against the foldback speakers. Nonetheless everyone was having a great time, and enjoyed what Sonic Animation had to offer."[14]

Sonic Animation's third studio album, Reality by Deception, was released on 4 February 2002, which peaked at No. 22 on the ARIA Albums Chart and No. 6 on the ARIA Dance chart.[9][15] Lee felt the album "pares back the more commercially-friendly vocals... in favour of more straight trance-light tracks more akin to their clubbing roots... [They] have flowed with a different aim in mind that has seen a decent, although not terribly inspiring release."[16] It provided the singles, "E-Ville" (October 2001), "I'm a DJ" (February 2002)[17] and "Super Showbiz Star" (April 2002).[16] "I'm a DJ" was listed at No. 74 on the Triple J Hottest 100, 2002.[18]

Sonic Animation's fourth studio album, Defective Perspective was released on 9 February 2004, which provided the singles, "This Is not a Love Poem" and "Get Up".[19][20] "This Is not a Love Poem" was based on lyrics by Philip Norton.[21] Leasa de Klerk of InTheMix felt that the two CDs provided a "sheer variety of styles and sounds that are on the album. The guys are really showing their flexibility in their lastest [sic] offering."[22]

Sonic Animation announced their break-up in mid-2005 with the release of compilation album, Eleven (September 2005), which appeared on the ARIA Dance Albums Chart top 25.[23] It was followed by the Bugger Off tour. They made their last festival appearance at the Big Day Out in 2006 (Australian shows only).

2011-present: reformation and Once More from the Bottom[edit]

In 2011 Cartwright and Keiller revealed a new Sonic Animation remix for world music outfit, Delhi 2 Dublin. They announced that they were back in the studio recording their next album.[24]

In March 2013, after an almost six-year hiatus, Sonic Animation released their fifth studio album, Once More from the Bottom. Adam Barbuto of Reverb noticed that "you get the feeling the lads from Sonic Animation have thrown their all into these songs and take this comeback super seriously. To somewhat refute any lack of confidence buyers may have had in the naming of the album, Once More from the Bottom, I can safely say SonicAnimation are anywhere near it. In fact I’d say they are back on track and heading for those big city lights."[25] Rip It Up!'s Simone Keenan felt that "Although there’s plenty of odd-ball tracks ... there is some quality too like the hip hop/dubstep 'Punk on the Dance Floor' (which sounds better than the title may suggest) and 'Take It from Me' which features guest vocals from Canadian songstress Sexton Blake. Dub, techno, funk, house... You’ll find all of it on here."[26] The album provided the single, "I Will Be Twisted"; its music video was created with fan-submitted footage taken on cell phones at the 2012 Homebake festival.

Members[edit]

Sonic animation are:

  • Adrian Cartwright
  • Rupert Keiller

with:

  • Steve Bertschik (circa 1994 - 1998)
  • Mark Saul (circa 1999-2001)
  • Richard Falkner (circa 2002-2004)
  • Erica Mclean (circa 2004 - 2006)
  • Sexton Blake aka Nadine Tremblay (circa 2012-2013)

Discography[edit]

Albums[edit]

List of studio albums, with release date and label details shown
Title Album details Peak chart positions Certifications
AUS
[9][27]
Silence is Deafening
  • Released: May 1997
  • Label: Azwan Transmissions (AZWAN024CD)
  • Format: CD
-
Orchid for the Afterworld
  • Released: October 1999
  • Label: Global Recordings (GRA591002)
  • Format: 2xCD
42
Reality by Deception
  • Released: February 2002
  • Label: Sputnik Records (334742)
  • Format: CD+CD_Rom
22
Defective Perspective -
Once More from the Bottom
  • Released: March 2013[28]
  • Label: MGM Records (SA0012013)
  • Format: CD, Digital download
-

Compilation albums[edit]

List of compilation albums, with release date and label details shown
Title Album details
Eleven
  • Released: September 2005
  • Label: Inertia Recordings (sonic011cd)
  • Format: 2xCD, Digital download

Extended plays[edit]

List of EP, with release date and label details shown
Title Album details
Zero Zero Zero Zero One
  • Released: 1995
  • Label: Azwan Transmissions (AZWAN016)
  • Format: CD, 12"
Force Feed
  • Released: 1996
  • Label: Azwan Transmissions (AZWAN018)
  • Format: CD, 12"
Silence Is Deafening 1
  • Released: 1997
  • Label: Azwan Transmissions (AZWAN023)
  • Format: 12"
Silence Is Deafening 2
  • Released: 1997
  • Label: Azwan Transmissions (AZWAN026)
  • Format: 12"
sonicanimation
  • Released: August 2011[29]
  • Label: Creative Vibes
  • Format: Digital download

Singles[edit]

List of singles, with year released and selected chart positions
Title Year Peak chart positions Album
AUS
[9]
"Time Is an Illusion" 1995 Non-album singles
"From Sand to Stars"
"Love Lies Bleeding" 1999 50 Orchid for the Afterworld
"Theophilus Thistler (An Exercise in Vowels)" 86
"Didley Squat" 2000
"I'm Afraid I Think I'm Human"
"E-Ville" 2001 73 Reality by Deception
"I'm a DJ" 2002 82[17]
"Super Showbiz Star"
"Freaky Highway" 2003 Defective Perspective
"This is Not a Love Poem" 2004
"Get Up"
"Will You Dance to This Song" 2011 sonicanimation
"(Hey Lady) I Just Wanna Dance"[30] 2012 One More from the Bottom
"Punk on the Dancefloor"[31] 2013

Awards[edit]

ARIA Music Awards[edit]

The ARIA Music Awards is an annual awards ceremony that recognises excellence, innovation, and achievement across all genres of Australian music. Sonic Animation has been nominated for three awards.[32]

Year Nominee / work Award Result
1999 "Love Lies Bleeding" Best Dance Release Nominated
2000 Orchid for the Afterworld Best Dance Release Nominated
ARIA Award for Breakthrough Artist – Album Nominated

References[edit]

  1. ^ Wesolowski, David Peter. "Sonic Animation | Biography & History". AllMusic. All Media Guide. Retrieved 10 October 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  2. ^ a b c d Cyclone (27 March 2013). "Sonic Animation Rupert Keiller". theMusic.com.au. Retrieved 10 October 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  3. ^ a b "Sonic Animation – Biography". Tripod. Archived from the original on 5 March 2016. Retrieved 10 October 2015.
  4. ^ a b c Bakker, Tiffany (23 April 2004). "Sound and furry – Music". The Sydney Morning Herald. Fairfax Media. Retrieved 10 October 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  5. ^ "Sonic Animation". J Play. Retrieved 10 October 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  6. ^ "Releases :: Force Feed". Australian Music Online. Australian Council for the Arts. Archived from the original on 22 November 2005. Retrieved 10 October 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  7. ^ a b c "Sonic Animation". Australian Music Resource and Webzine. Oz Music Project. Archived from the original on 7 August 2003. Retrieved 11 October 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  8. ^ a b c d "sonic(re)animation". Woroni. Canberra, ACT: National Library of Australia. 1 March 2002. p. 21. Retrieved 11 October 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  9. ^ a b c d e f Hung, Steffen. "Discography Sonic Animation" (ASP). Australian Charts Portal. Hung Medien (Steffen Hung). Retrieved 11 October 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  10. ^ a b Lee, Jasper (Jaz). "Sonic Animaiton: 'Love Lies Bleeding". Australian Music Resource and Webzine. Oz Music Project. Archived from the original on 7 August 2003. Retrieved 11 October 2015.
  11. ^ a b "Hottest 100 1999". Triple J. Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC). Retrieved 11 October 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  12. ^ "Sonicanimation song lyric, 1999". Collection Database. Powerhouse Museum. Retrieved 10 October 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  13. ^ a b "ARIA Charts – Accreditations – 2005 Albums". Australian Recording Industry Association. Archived from the original on 26 July 2020.
  14. ^ Lee, Jasper (Jaz) (7 April 2000). "Sonic Animation @ Macquarie Uni, Sydney". Australian Music Resource and Webzine. Oz Music Project. Archived from the original on 7 August 2003. Retrieved 11 October 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  15. ^ "The ARIA Report" (PDF). Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA). 11 February 2002. p. 13. Archived from the original (PDF) on 21 February 2002. Retrieved 11 October 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  16. ^ a b Lee, Jasper (Jaz). "Sonic Animation: Reality by Deception". Australian Music Resource and Webzine. Oz Music Project. Archived from the original on 7 August 2003. Retrieved 11 October 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  17. ^ a b "The ARIA Report" (PDF). Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA). 11 March 2002. p. 4. Archived from the original (PDF) on 14 March 2002. Retrieved 11 October 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  18. ^ "Hottest 100 2002". Triple J. Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC). Retrieved 11 October 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  19. ^ Sonic Animation (2004), Defective Perspective, Independent : MGM Distribution. National Library of Australia, retrieved 13 October 2015 CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  20. ^ "Defective Perspective: Sonic Animation". Australian Music Online. Australian Council of the Arts. Archived from the original on 7 August 2008. Retrieved 13 October 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  21. ^ "People: Philip Norton". The Brisbane Institute (Kay Saunders) [sic]. 21 January 2006. Archived from the original on 12 December 2006. Retrieved 13 October 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  22. ^ de Klerk, Leasa (17 February 2004). "Sonic Animation: Nu skool electro, operatic punk, country & western!". InTheMix. Junkee Media. Retrieved 13 October 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  23. ^ "The ARIA Report" (PDF). Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA). 5 September 2005. p. 15. Archived from the original (PDF) on 20 August 2005. Retrieved 13 October 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  24. ^ Sonic Animation re-forms for new album Archived 31 December 2012 at archive.today
  25. ^ Barbuto, Adam (5 March 2013). "[CD Review] Sonic Animation – Once More From The Bottom". Reverb. Retrieved 13 October 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  26. ^ Keenan, Simone (4 April 2013). "Sonic Animation: Once More from the Bottom". Rip It Up!. Archived from the original on 23 July 2013. Retrieved 13 October 2015.
  27. ^ Ryan, Gavin (2011). Australia's Music Charts 1988–2010 (PDF ed.). Mt. Martha, VIC, Australia: Moonlight Publishing.
  28. ^ "Once More from the Bottom". Apple Music. March 2013. Retrieved 20 July 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  29. ^ "sonicanimation (EP)". Apple Music. August 2011. Retrieved 20 July 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  30. ^ "(Hey Lady) I Just Wanna Dance". Apple Music. February 2012. Retrieved 20 July 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  31. ^ "Punk on the Dancefloor". Apple Music. June 2013. Retrieved 20 July 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  32. ^ "ARIA Awards Search Results – Sonic Animation". ARIA Awards. ARIA Awards. Retrieved 20 July 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)