Stirrup spout vessel

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Chimú Stirrup Vessel, between 1100 and 1550. The Walters Art Museum.

A stirrup spout vessel (so called because of its resemblance to a stirrup) is a type of ceramic vessel common among several Pre-Columbian cultures of South America beginning in the early 2nd millennium BCE.[1]

These cultures included the Chavin and the Moche. In these vessels the stirrup handle actually forms part of the spout, which emanates from the top of the stirrup. The jars, which were often elaborately figurative, would be cast from a mold, while the stirrup spout was built by hand and welded to the vessel with slip.[2]

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References[edit]

  1. ^ "Stirrup-spout bottle [Peru; Cupisnique] (1978.412.38)". In Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History. New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2000–. (October 2006) Retrieved 10 May 2009
  2. ^ "Seated figure bottle [Peru; Moche] (82.1.30)". In Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History. New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2000–. (October 2006) Retrieved 10 May 2009