Storm King Dam

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Storm King Dam
Storm King Dam, 2015 01.JPG
Storm King Dam, 2015
Storm King Dam is located in Queensland
Storm King Dam
Storm King Dam
Location9 km (5.6 mi) South-East of Stanthorpe, Queensland
Coordinates28°42′47″S 151°59′40″E / 28.7130°S 151.9944°E / -28.7130; 151.9944 (Storm King Dam (reservoir))Coordinates: 28°42′47″S 151°59′40″E / 28.7130°S 151.9944°E / -28.7130; 151.9944 (Storm King Dam (reservoir))
Typereservoir
Primary inflowsQuart Pot Creek
Primary outflowsQuart Pot Creek
Basin countriesAustralia
Managing agencySouthern Downs Regional Council
Built1954
Water volume2,180 ML (77×10^6 cu ft)

Storm King Dam is a reservoir created by the dam of the same name in the locality of Storm King in the Southern Downs Region, Queensland, Australia.[1] It provides water for the town of Stanthorpe.[2]

Geography[edit]

Storm King Dam was created from Quart Pot Creek which is the only inflow (28°44′33″S 151°59′32″E / 28.7425°S 151.9923°E / -28.7425; 151.9923 (Storm King Dam (inflow))) and outflow of the dam (28°42′33″S 151°59′35″E / 28.7091°S 151.9931°E / -28.7091; 151.9931 (Storm King Dam (wall and outflow))).[3]

History[edit]

The dam takes its name from the Storm King Mining Company which was established by John Yaldwyn and James Ross, who built an earlier dam for mining purposes. The company, in turn, took its name from the sailing ship Storm King, on which they migrated to Australia, arriving 9 February 1872.[1]

The present dam was first proposed in 1928 but was not built until 1954 by the Stanthorpe Shire Council.[4] It had filled by February 1954.[5] Following local government area amalgamations in 2008, the dam is currently operated by the Southern Downs Regional Council. It supplies water both to residents of Stanthorpe and to irrigators.[2]

In the 1980s, the Memorial School of Arts was relocated from Amiens to the dam to expand the recreation centre in the youth camp.[6][7] It opened in Amiens in 1926.[8]

During drought periods, the dam has proved inadequate to meet the needs of the community it serves. In 2007, Storm King Dam was carrying as little as two months supply.[2] In August 2019, the dam was almost dry and plans were being made to bring drinking water to the community by truck.[9] The shire council delivered water by truck from approximately January 2020 to March 2021. Following heavy rain on the eastern seaboard in mid-late March 2021, the dam filled and started to spill.[10]

Amenities[edit]

Storm King Dam is available for recreational use, including fishing, water sports, bird watching and picnics. Fish in the dam include Murray cod, yellowbelly and silver perch. The lake attracts many water birds including pelicans. Barbeques and other picnic facilities are available. Boating is permitted on the lake, but motor boats require a permit.[11]

There is a boat ramp and jetty off Eukey Road (28°42′55″S 151°59′32″E / 28.7154°S 151.9923°E / -28.7154; 151.9923 (Storm King Dam boat ramp)). It is managed by the Southern Downs Regional Council.[12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Storm King Dam (entry 32613)". Queensland Place Names. Queensland Government. Retrieved 14 June 2015.
  2. ^ a b c "Granite Belt Water Planning". Southern Downs Regional Council. Archived from the original on 10 June 2015. Retrieved 14 June 2015.
  3. ^ "Queensland Globe". State of Queensland. Retrieved 27 January 2022.
  4. ^ "COUNCIL MEETINGS". The Brisbane Courier. 14 September 1928. p. 11. Retrieved 14 June 2015 – via National Library of Australia.
  5. ^ "Dam is full". The Courier-Mail. Brisbane. 23 February 1954. p. 12. Retrieved 14 June 2015 – via National Library of Australia.
  6. ^ "Social". Amiens History Association. Archived from the original on 25 January 2022. Retrieved 25 January 2022.
  7. ^ "Amiens Memorial Hall, ca. 1955". State Library of Queensland. Archived from the original on 26 January 2022. Retrieved 26 January 2022.
  8. ^ "AMIENS". The Brisbane Courier. No. 21, 356. Queensland, Australia. 7 July 1926. p. 20. Archived from the original on 26 January 2022. Retrieved 27 January 2022 – via National Library of Australia.
  9. ^ Bradfield, Elly (5 August 2019). "Day zero approaches for Stanthorpe as locals face prospect of levy to cover cost of trucked-in water". weatherzone.com.au. Archived from the original on 5 August 2019. Retrieved 26 January 2022.
  10. ^ Bradfield, Elly; Robinson, Lucy; Daly, Jon (25 March 2021). "'Good for the soul': This town trucked in water for 15 months — now the dam is overflowing". ABC News. Archived from the original on 25 March 2021. Retrieved 27 January 2022.
  11. ^ "Storm King Dam". Queensland Government. Archived from the original on 24 September 2015. Retrieved 14 June 2015.
  12. ^ "Recreational Boating Facilities Queensland". Queensland Open Data. Queensland Government. 12 November 2020. Archived from the original on 22 November 2020. Retrieved 22 November 2020.

External links[edit]

Media related to Storm King Dam at Wikimedia Commons