Strela (satellite)

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Strela
ManufacturerNPO PM
Country of originSoviet Union
Russia
OperatorVKS/GRU
VKO
ApplicationsCommunication
Specifications
Design life5 years
Power40 Watts from solar panels
BatteriesNickel hydrogen
EquipmentUHF transponders
(NATO B/D band)
Data rate of up to 64 kb/s)
RegimeLow Earth
Production
StatusOperational
Related spacecraft
DerivativesGonets

Strela (Russian: Стрела, arrow) is a Russian (previously Soviet) military communications satellite constellation operating in low Earth orbit.

These satellites operate as mailboxes ("store-and-forward"): they remember the received messages and then resend them after scheduled time, or by command from the Earth. Some sources state the satellites are capable of only three months of active operation, but in accordance to others[1] they can serve for about five years. The satellites are used for transmission of encrypted messages and images.

History[edit]

The first three satellites, Kosmos 38 (reentered 1964-11-08), Kosmos 39 (reentered 1964-11-17) and Kosmos 40 (reentered 1964-11-17), were launched on 18 August 1964. Five different types of Strela satellites have been launched, designated Strela-1 (1964-65), Strela-1M (1970-1992), Strela-2 (1965-1968), Strela-2M (1970-1994), and Strela-3 (1985-2010).[2][3][4][5][6][7] Strela satellites are also used for the civilian Gonets program. The current version of Strela, Strela-3M is also known as Rodnik. [8]

Accidents and incidents[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://swfound.org/media/6575/swf_iridium_cosmos_collision_fact_sheet_updated_2012.pdf
  2. ^ "Satellite Catalog Number index (updated Jan 2008)". Jonathan McDowell. Retrieved 2009-02-12.
  3. ^ "Strela-1 (11F610)". Gunter Dirk Krebs. 2009-01-30. Retrieved 2009-02-12.
  4. ^ "Strela-1M (11F625)". Gunter Dirk Krebs. 2009-01-30. Retrieved 2009-02-12.
  5. ^ "Strela-2 (11F610)". Gunter Dirk Krebs. 2009-01-30. Retrieved 2009-02-12.
  6. ^ "Strela-2M (11F610)". Gunter Dirk Krebs. 2009-01-30. Retrieved 2009-02-12.
  7. ^ "Strela-3 (17F13)". Gunter Dirk Krebs. 2009-01-30. Retrieved 2009-02-12.
  8. ^ "Strela-3M (14F132)". Gunter Dirk Krebs. 2012. Retrieved 2012-08-10.
  9. ^ Iannotta, Becky (2009-02-11). "U.S. Satellite Destroyed in Space Collision". Space.com. Retrieved 2009-02-11.

External links[edit]