Stuart Bertolotti-Bailey

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Stuart Bertolotti-Bailey (previously Stuart Bailey; born 1973) is a British graphic designer, writer and editor. In 2000 he co-founded the bi-annual arts journal Dot Dot Dot with Peter Bil'ak. In 2006 he began working with American graphic designer, writer and editor David Reinfurt under the pseudonym Dexter Sinister,[1] which is also the name of their 'just-in-time workshop and occasional bookstore' on New York's Lower East Side. Reinfurt replaced Bil'ak as co-editor of Dot Dot Dot the same year; it continued under Bailey and Reinfurt's direction until the final, 20th issue in 2010 before being replaced by Bulletins of the Serving Library, co-edited by Bailey and Reinfurt together with American artist and writer Angie Keefer until 2017.[2] The journal has since morphed into a non-profit organization that variously serves as a publishing platform, a seminar room, a collection of framed objects, and an event space.[3] The Serving Library Annual is co-edited by Stuart Bertolotti-Bailey, Italian curator and editor Francesca Bertolotti-Bailey, David Reinfurt, and Italian writer and translator Vincenzo Latronico, and published by Roma Publications], Amsterdam.[4] Since 2017 he has held the position of Head of Design at the Institute of Contemporary Arts in London,[5] where he lives.

Education[edit]

Bertolotti-Bailey studied Typography & Graphic Communication at the University of Reading, and was one of the first participants to study at the Werkplaats Typografie, a postgraduate program co-founded by Dutch graphic designers Wigger Bierma and Karel Martens in Arnhem, The Netherlands.[6] In 2015 he received a PhD from the Fine Art Department of the University of Reading with a thesis titled Work in Progress: Form as a Way of Thinking.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "David Reinfurt". Lewis Center, Princeton. Retrieved 24 August 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  2. ^ "Liverpool Biennial of Contemporary Art". Retrieved 24 August 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  3. ^ "The Serving Library". Retrieved 24 August 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  4. ^ "Roma Publications". Retrieved 24 August 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  5. ^ "Institute of Contemporary Arts". Retrieved 24 August 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  6. ^ "Rhode Island School of Design". Retrieved 24 August 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  7. ^ "Dexter Sinister". Retrieved 24 August 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)

External links[edit]