Syracuse, Geneva and Corning Railway

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Syracuse, Geneva and Corning Railway
Locale Corning, New York to Geneva, New York
and Dresden Branch Penn Yan to Dresden
Dates of operation 1875–1909
Successor New York Central Railroad
Track gauge 4 ft 8 12 in (1,435 mm) standard gauge
Headquarters Watkins, New York

The Syracuse, Geneva and Corning Railway was established in 1875 and opened their road on December 10, 1877. The company was leased to and operated by the Fall Brook Coal Company for 20 years beginning in 1881.[1]

On October 1, 1885, the company consolidated without a change of name with the Penn Yan and New York Railroad Company, which was leased to the New York Central and Hudson River Railroad Company in 1899.[2] In 1909, the company merged with Geneva, Corning and Southern Railroad and once again in 1914, into New York Central Railroad (NYCRR).

History[edit]

The Syracuse, Geneva and Corning Railway Company was chartered on August 27, 1875, and opened for business on December 10, 1877. It was leased to and operated by the Fall Brook Coal Company at a rental rate of 88.5 percent of its gross receipts for a period of 20 years.[2]

Philadelphia to Buffalo interchange[edit]

On February 4, 1882, the Syracuse, Geneva and Corning Railway signed a 900-year contract with the New York Central and Hudson River Railroad along with the Corning Cowanesque and Antrim Railway, the Fall Brook Coal Company, the Jersey Shore, Pine Creek and Buffalo Railway Company, the Philadelphia and Reading Railroad Company and the Philadelphia and Reading Coal and Iron Company, providing for an interchange of through and local traffic and the formation a through line between Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and Buffalo, New York.[2]

Penn Yan and New York railroad[edit]

On October 1, 1885, the company consolidated without a change of name with the Penn Yan and New York Railroad Company. Their main line ran from Corning, New York to Geneva, New York, a distance of 57.76 miles (92.96 km) and the Dresden Branch ran from Penn Yan to Dresden, a total distance of 6.43 miles (10.35 km).[2]

Operations[edit]

By December 1888, the rolling stock consisted of 60 locomotive engines, 24 passenger cars, 8 baggage and mail cars, 2,272 freight including box, stock, platform and coal cars. Additionally, 39 caboose cars and 171 miscellaneous cars.[2]

Financial[edit]

Capital stock outstanding by December 31, 1888, was $1,325,000.[2] That same year 138,088 passengers traveled on the road a total distance of 116,960 miles (188,230 km) and freight shipped a distance of 534,996 miles (860,993 km). Net earnings were $189,905 with outstanding capital stock of $1,325,000 with funded debt on 30-year $1,000 bonds due on March 1, 1909. The treasurer's address was Grand Central Depot in New York City.[2]

Company management[edit]

By December 1888, company directors were George J. Magee, John Lang, Daniel Beach, Abram S. Stothoff, all of Watkins, New York, and Austin Lathrop of Corning, New York, Edwin D. Worcester, Dwight W. Pardee, Chauncey M. Depew, Charles C. Clarke, E. V. W. Rossiter, Samuel F. Barger, Isaac P. Chambers, all of New York City and James Tillinghast of Buffalo, New York.[2]

George J. Magee was president, John Lang was vice-president, E. D. Worcester was treasurer and Daniel Beach was secretary. The principal office and main address was in Watkins, New York, and the transfer office was in Corning, New York.

Leased lines[edit]

On May 12, 1892, a new lease to the Corning Cowanesque and Antrim Railway Company became operative and remained in force until May 1, 1899, when, under the terms of an agreement dated April 11, 1899, the lease of 1892 was cancelled, and the property leased to the New York Central and Hudson River Railroad Company from May 1, 1899, for the term of its corporate existence, the consideration being a cash rental of $46,375 per annum, and interest upon all outstanding bonds and obligations.[1]

New York Central railroad[edit]

In 1909, the company merged with Geneva, Corning and Southern Railroad and once again in 1914 into New York Central Railroad (NYCRR).

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "New York State Railroads and New York Central Railroad". kinglyheirs.com, 2010. Retrieved February 12, 2011. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h Poor, Henry Varnum. Manual of the railroads of the United States, Volume 22. Poors, 1889 p. 85; 317. Retrieved February 4, 2011.